MTPR

U.S. Supreme Court

U.S. Supreme Court file photo.
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HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place Montana's voter-approved limits on contributions to political campaigns in state elections, a decision that likely ends a legal challenge that lasted more than seven years and disrupted the 2012 governor's race.

The justices rejected an appeal from opponents of contribution limits, who argued that the caps on political donations are an unconstitutional limit on free speech and free association, and prevent candidates from running effective campaigns.

Republican U.S. Senate Candidate Matt Rosendale poses with Vice President Mike Pence at a rally in Bozeman.
Matt Rosendale Campaign Twitter Feed

In his visit to Bozeman today, Vice President Mike Pence criticized Montana’s Democratic Senator Jon Tester for announcing his opposition to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before an FBI investigation into the judge is completed.

Sally Mauk: Welcome to Campaign Beat, our weekly political analysis program. I'm Sally Mauk and I'm joined by University of Montana Political Science Professor Rob Saldin and Veteran Capitol Reporter Chuck Johnson.

Late Friday morning Montana Democratic Senator Jon Tester announced his decision to oppose the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Here's the press release in its entirety:

"(Big Sandy, Mont.)—U.S. Senator Jon Tester today announced he will vote against the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh, the nominee to serve a lifetime appointment on the United States Supreme Court.

Fox News

Montana’s Republican Senator Steve Daines weighed in on the latest allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh today.

On Sunday, The New Yorker published allegations from a Colorado woman who says Kavanaugh exposed himself to her at a party when the two were students at Yale in the 1980s.

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