Montana Public Radio

U.S. Geological Survey

Researchers survey for stoneflies in the backcountry of Glacier National Park, Sept 1, 2019. Two species of stonefly were listed as "threatened" due to warmer water, drought and diminishing meltwater from vanishing glaciers.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

Aquatic insects living at high elevations in Glacier National Park may be more resilient to impacts from climate change than was once thought. That's according to a study published this week. Populations of various other species are still expected to decline and potentially go extinct.

Elk at a feed ground in Wyoming.
USGS (PD)

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — An annual elk hunt in Grand Teton National Park doesn't draw in and concentrate large numbers of grizzly bears, scientists have concluded.

The November to December hunt probably takes place too late in the year for grizzly bears to seek out animal remains that hunters leave behind, according to researchers with the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team.

Western glacier stoneflies thrive in glacial meltwater in high-elevation alpine environments. But scientists estimate the famed ice masses and snowfields of Glacier National Park will have mostly disappeared by 2030.
Joe Giersch, Aquatic Entomologist / USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

Two stone fly species found in Glacier National Park were listed as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act Wednesday due to the impacts of climate change, according to a rule published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The two species, the western glacier stone fly and the meltwater lednian stone fly, depend on glacial meltwater in high-elevation alpine environments. But scientists estimate the famed ice masses and snowfields of Glacier National Park will have mostly disappeared by 2030.

National Air Pollutant Concentration Averages, 1990-2018.
U.S. EPA Air Quality System

Snow samples from three national parks in the Rocky Mountains reflect improved air quality in the region since the mid-1990s. That’s according to a recent publication from the National Park Service.

Thus undated photo from the National Park Service shows an unidentified scientist with a golden eagle that has been fitted with a tracking device. Officials say this bird has died of lead poisoning.
National Park Service (PD)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — The first golden eagle in Yellowstone National Park fitted with a tracking device has died of lead poisoning, likely after consuming bullet fragments while scavenging the remains of an animal killed by a hunter, officials said Monday.

Huckleberries in Glacier Park.
Glacier National Park (PD)


A new study mapping huckleberries in Glacier National Park could help grizzlies thrive in the area, and figure out how the tasty fruits respond to a changing climate.

Yellowstone Park's Steamboat Geyser during a 2004 eruption.
(PD)

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — The world's largest active geyser has erupted again in Yellowstone National Park.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the Steamboat Geyser erupted early Sunday, its fifth eruption this year.

Yellowstone visitors line up at the park's north entrance outside of Gardiner, Montana.
Yellowstone National Park (PD)

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — A recent report says visitors to Yellowstone National Park spent nearly $500 million last year in neighboring towns to the wilderness recreation area.

Lake Koocanusa
Darren Kirby (CC-BY-SA-3)

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new modeling framework for collection and analysis of selenium data in Lake Koocanusa.

The framework is designed to organize data collected by different agencies using different protocols, with a long-term goal of helping managers develop a common water quality standard for selenium levels in Lake Koocanusa, which straddles the international border.

USGS map showing the areas shaken by Thursday's earthquake.
USGS

From bar stools to bed frames, hundreds of Montanans felt the magnitude 5.8 earthquake early Thursday morning that originated a few miles southeast of Lincoln.

Listen to the audio to hear what the quake’s seismograph reading sounds like. Thanks to French geologist Anthony Lomax for tweeting this audio file, produced by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology.

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