MTPR

University of Montana

UM President Seth Bodnar meets with UM's oldest living graduate Emma Lommasson in Missoula, Thursday Feb. 15, 2018.
Edward O'Brien

At 106 years-old Emma Lommasson is the University of Montana’s oldest living graduate. When Lommasson woke up Thursday morning, she could boast of having met all but five of UM’s presidents. By Thursday afternoon, with the help of some loyal friends, that list whittled down to four when President Seth Bodnar walked in her senior living center to surprise her.

On Tuesday night controversial right-wing speaker Mike Adams gave a lecture at the University of Montana.

Adams, a professor of criminal justice at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, was brought to Missoula by a conservative donor to UM’s School of Journalism. Maria Cole supports the Jeff Cole Distinguished Lecture Series, named for her late husband, who was a journalist.

University of Montana President Seth Bodnar talks to reporters about UM's future and his plans for tackling the university's budget shortfall, January 31, 2018.
Eric Whitney

University of Montana President Seth Bodnar says the school needs to find $10 million in spending cuts and revenue increases to bring its budget into balance by 2022.

William Dale Newhoff
Missoula County Sheriff's Office

A man police were chasing as an armed and dangerous federal fugitive in East Missoula this morning is in police custody tonight after being caught this afternoon.

About 11 o’clock Tuesday morning, a car chase ended in a truck crashing into a tree at an East Missoula mobile home court. William Dale Newhoff fled that scene on foot. 

University of Montana President Seth Bodnar.
University of Montana

The University of Montana’s new president says UM is facing a defining moment. Seth Bodnar describes the university’s budgeting and enrollment challenges as ‘significant’.

UM’s enrollment has steadily declined since its all-time high of over 15,000 in the spring of 2011. Last fall there were just shy of 12,000 total students. University officials touted a 2 percent bump in freshmen enrollment last fall and they’re eager to build on that modest progress. Bodnar, now in his second week in Main Hall, says the path forward is fraught with challenge, but adds he’s confident UM’s best days are ahead of it.

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