Montana Public Radio

travel

Bug Bytes: The Human Botfly

Jun 12, 2020
Glenn Marangelo

You’ve taken a remarkable trip to Central or South America. You saw incredible species of birds and mammals, and of course were “wowed” by the amazing insects you discovered. You return with life-long memories, beautiful photos and some souvenirs. But unfortunately some travelers return with an unexpected stowaway...the human botfly.

(L-R) Toby O'Rourke, Walt Muralt, Drake Doepke.
courtesy

Between March 15 and April 10, 2020, more than 64,000 Montanans lost their jobs and filed for unemployment benefits. In mid-April, Can Do host Arnie Sherman caught up with previous guests to learn how government stimulus programs and breathtaking shifts in the business environment are driving their decisions as employers and entrepreneurs. In Part Two of this two-part episode, you'll get an update from three Montana business owners in the fields of trucking, travel and dining. 

"I think fear is for people who don't get out very much. The flipside of fear is understanding. We gain understanding when we travel ... Get out, celebrate the diversity, be inspired," says Rick Steves, host of Travel with Rick Steves.

The program joined MTPR's new radio schedule at the beginning of the month. Steves speaks with MTPR's Michael Marsolek about how travel can help you get out of your comfort zone, grow and better understand the world.

Can Do: Seizing An Adventurous Life

Feb 22, 2019

Brian Morgan has a superpower: he’s figured out how to turn his wanderlust into a thriving business. In 1999 he created Adventure Life, a Missoula, Montana-based travel business offering clients personalized tours around the globe.

Morgan defines adventure travel as “Going somewhere that’s going to put you out of your comfort zone a little bit, and something that’s really going to introduce you to cultures and environments that you’re not familiar — that’s the core part of adventure.”

American Airlines plane.
Stock photo (PD)

Passenger traffic at Missoula International Airport last year set an all-time record. The airport handled over 848,000 passengers. That’s a 10 percent increase over 2017.

Since 2000 the airport has seen an 85 percent increase in passenger traffic.

Tourists at the Apgar Visitor Center in Glacier National Park.
GlacierNPS (PD)

Montana saw a small decline in out-of-state visitors in 2018, but an increase in overall tourism spending.

Jeremy Sage is the assistant director of the Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research at the University of Montana, which released the report.

Number of resident trips and spending to travel regions, 2017.
University of Montana Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research

Montanans spent more than $2.8 billion on in-state trips last year according to a new report from the University of Montana’s Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research.

The study looked at day and overnight trips for leisure, business, and other reasons that took people at least 50 miles away from their homes.

A new tax on airplane fuel is nearing a final vote in the Montana Legislature.
(PD)

United Airlines will offer direct flights next year from Missoula and Kalispell to Los Angeles. The new seasonal daily service begins in early June.

Missoula International Airport Deputy Director Brian Ellestad says it will be a real boon for Montana.

Seal Press

Overwhelmed with her fast-paced, competitive lifestyle, Amy Ragsdale moved with her husband, writer Peter Stark, and their two teenage children from the U.S. to a small town in northeastern Brazil, where she hoped they would learn the value of a slower life.

Cows, Dogs, and 'The Montana Posse' Harass Hiker

May 18, 2016

In September 2012, Ken Ilgunas stuck out his thumb in Denver, Colorado, and hitchhiked 1,500 miles north to the Alberta tar sands. After being duly appalled, he commenced to walk nearly 2,000 miles, (mostly) following the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, from Alberta to the Texas Gulf Coast.

It would become a 4.5 month journey across the Great Plains. To follow the pipe, he couldn't take roads. Instead, he walked across fields, grasslands, and private property. He had to trespass across America.

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