Montana Public Radio

Toole County

Montana Infections Set Record As Outbreak Hits Nursing Home

Jul 7, 2020
On June 24, assisted living businesses and workers asked the Montana Legislature to increase payments for day-to-day services for seniors and people with disabilities.
(PD)

A Billings nursing home said 58 residents and staff have tested positive for the coronavirus and the facility has been put under quarantine. This comes as the state reported on Tuesday its highest daily total of confirmed infections since the pandemic began.

Ambulances at the Glacier County EMS facility.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

Imagine calling 911 for an ambulance and the dispatcher tells you there isn’t one available. That could soon be the case for many Glacier County residents. The county says its emergency medical services are close to folding amid the local government’s long standing financial woes.

Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018
U.S. Census Bureau

New population numbers released by the U.S. Census Bureau Thursday show that Gallatin County’s population has grown 25 percent since the 2010 census.

That’s far ahead of Madison County which had the next highest growth rate at 14 percent.

The Latest: Montana Governor Declares Flooding Emergency

Apr 18, 2018
The Milk River is forecast to remain above Moderate flood stage into next week, possibly reaching Major flood stage for a time. Areas that have yet to experience flooding in this area may begin to see flooding soon.
National Weather Service Great Falls, MT.

HAVRE, Mont. (AP) — The Latest on flooding in Montana (all times local): 4:15 p.m.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock says there is a flooding emergency in seven counties and the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation.

The emergency declaration issued Wednesday allows the use of state government services and equipment, and allows the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers to help protect infrastructure.

The governor's office says flooding from rapid snowmelt has the potential to cause widespread damage to homes, farms and infrastructure such as roads.

The Cut Bank voting center.
Corin Cates-Carney

Before Rob Quist became a politician, or toured the country in a bluegrass band, he lived in Cut Bank, a rural Hi-line town near where the Rocky Mountains meet the eastern plains.

The young Quist lived on a ranch just north of the town with his family. Back then, Cut Bank was one of Montana’s big-time oil producers, Quist was his high school’s student body president, and he helped the Cut Bank Wolves win a state basketball championship, leading the team in scoring in the title game.