MTPR

Tom Bansak

A boat at the Flathead Lake Biological Station.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

A viral Facebook post is spreading false information about a toxic blue-green algae bloom in Flathead Lake, according to lake researchers. The post claims that a dog died after swimming in the lake, but the Flathead Lake Biological Research Station says there’s no evidence to support the claim.

A boat at the Flathead Lake Biological Station.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

The University of Montana’s Flathead Lake Biological Station is asking businesses in the area to help fund its work.

Proceeds from the drive that starts Monday will benefit research and monitoring on Flathead, Whitefish, and Swan lakes, and the surrounding watersheds.

Assistant Director Tom Bansak leads a tour through research laboratories at the University of Montana's Flathead Lake Biological Station on Wednesday.
Nicky Ouellet

The new director of the Flathead Lake Biological Station says the station is poised to become the leading freshwater research station in the country.

Jim Elser can’t physically contain his excitement at being put in charge of the station, which he showed off at its annual open house Wednesday.

The Flathead Lake Biological Station's next director is James Elser. Elser is an internationally renowned freshwater ecologist with more than 220 publications in prestigious scientific journals.
Corin Cates-Carney

The Flathead Lake Biological Station’s new director, Jim Elser was introduced during a open house at the station on Wednesday.

The Flathead Lake Biological Station is one of oldest active biological stations in the United States, opened in 1899 to study freshwater biology.

Flathead Lake Biological Station research boat, Jessie-B.
Courtesy Flathead Lake Biological Station

The Flathead Lake Biological Station has received funding to fix up one of their oldest research boats. The Jessie-B is a research vessel used for long term monitoring and has been the main boat for working on Flathead Lake. Tom Bansak, a research scientist and Development Coordinator at the station says the Jessie-B is also 25-years-old and in need of repair.