MTPR

Tod McKay

The Wigwam Fire burning near Ennis on Aug. 15.
Inciweb

Rain in western Montana Monday did little to slow fire growth across the state.

"Well it’s a mixed blessing," said Jay Nichols, a spokesperson assigned to the Monument and Wigwam Fires burning south of Ennis. "So obviously wind isn’t a good thing, rain’s a good thing, but I don’t know that it will be a substantial amount of rain."

Reynolds Lake fire near the Junction of 1381 Road to Reynolds Lake Trailhead
InciWeb

A new estimate puts the Reynolds Lake Fire in the Bitterroot National Forest at more than 1,000 acres.

Forest spokesman Tod McKay said the fire grew from 10-15 acres yesterday morning to 1,068 acres by the day’s end. It was pushed by 30 mile-per-hour winds.

Montana Wildfire Roundup For July 18, 2018

Jul 18, 2018
The Reynolds Lake Fire on the Bitterroot National Forest was discovered July 17, 2018. Its size is currently unknown. More than 50 firefighters and a Very Large Air Tanker have been called in to fight the fire.
Google Maps

Wildfire season has arrived as fire danger ratings are increasing in national forests and wildlands throughout Montana. The Kootenai National Forest moved to "very high" Wednesday, and the Bitterroot National Forest switched to "high" fire danger this morning following the discovery of two lightning-caused fires Tuesday. The Flathead National Forest and surrounding area has also moved their fire danger to “high” this week.

Wet Weather Hampers Prescribed Burns In Montana

May 8, 2017
A firefighter works to control a blaze at the edge of back-burn on a private ranch near the Roaring Lion Fire, August 3, 2016.
Mike Albans

HAMILTON, Mont. (AP) — A snowy winter and a wet spring in western Montana are making it hard to conduct prescribed burns to reduce the risk of wildfires later in the year, federal forest managers said.

Snowmobile
Maropak (CC-BY-SA-3)

The Bitterroot National Forest’s first, newly updated travel plan in 40 years is facing its first legal challenge.

A coalition of seven multiple-use recreation groups describes their lawsuit as a, "last resort to stop the federal overreach of agencies running roughshod over public lands."

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