Montana Public Radio

symbiosis

Bug Bytes: Burying Beetles And Mites

Jun 16, 2020
Photo courtesy of Kyle Hartse

Burying beetles are often called sexton beetles since they perform duties similar to a sexton or gravedigger.

These beetles have an amazing ability to locate fresh carrion from long distances, allowing them to find this valuable food source before competing scavengers do. But rather than consume the departed mouse, vole, shrew or other small vertebrate for themselves, they have other plans.

Bug Bytes: Sloth Moths

Jun 15, 2020
A three-toed sloth at Lake Gatun in the Republic of Panama.
Stefan Laube / https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-toed_sloth#/media/File:Bradypus.jpg

It’s no secret that sloths move slowly. In fact, they move so slow, unique assemblages of insects can actually take advantage of their pace and align their lifecycle with these slow-moving hosts.

An interesting example is the relationship between the brown three-toed sloth and a moth aptly called the sloth moth.

Flickr user, Jason Hollinger (CC-BY-2.0)

Recently, the work of lichenologist Toby Spribille, a research professor based part-year at the University of Montana-Missoula, has upended the idea that lichen are an alliance between just one fungus and one algae. In many lichens, a mysterious yeast is the third player in this symbiosis.