MTPR

Susan Dunlap

Uptown Butte, MT.
Mike Albans

The gag order on the Butte Superfund cleanup agreement was partially lifted by a federal judge yesterday. Susan Dunlap, the Montana Standard’s natural resources reporter spoke with MTPR’s Nora Saks about what that means for the mining city.

The Berkeley pit in Butte, Montana, as seen from above.
NASA (CC-BY-2)

The mining companies in charge of the Berkeley Pit are going to start pumping, treating and discharging the water in the former open pit copper mine into Silver Bow Creek five years earlier than planned. Susan Dunlap is reporting that story for the Montana Standard in Butte. She spoke to MTPR's Nora Saks.

Uptown Butte, looking north, at the intersection of Main Street and Park Street in April, 2006.
(PD)

The board that’s in charge of $14 million for community redevelopment related to the Butte Superfund settlement said this week that it only intends to use interest that money is earning to fund local grant requests. Reporter Susan Dunlap has been following the board for the Montana Standard, and joined us earlier to explain what it’s doing.


A lot of people know about the Berkeley Pit in Butte, but not many know about another significant pollution challenge in the Mining City. It’s called the Parrot Plume, and there’s controversy over whether it needs to be cleaned up, and if so, who would pay for it.