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sexual abuse

Boy Scout badges.
iStock

The Boy Scouts of America is being threatened by a growing wave of lawsuits over decades-old allegations of sexual abuse. More litigation is on the way as lawyers for alleged abuse victims from Montana prepare to file suit against the organization.


A former Montana high school athletics trainer was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison on Tuesday for sexually abusing boys in Miles City. YPR News’ Kayla Desroches was in the federal courtroom during the sentencing hearing and shares her reporting with Nicky Ouellet.


Dozens of men have accused former Miles City athletic trainer James “Doc” Jensen of sexual abuse dating back to when they were student-athletes in high school.

FRONTLINE and The Wall Street Journal investigate a pediatrician accused of sexually abusing Native American boys for years. This photograph was taken on the Blackfeet reservation in Browning, Montana.
Mike Shum / Wall Street Journal/FRONTLINE

In January, former Indian Health Service Doctor Stanley Weber was sentenced to 18 years in prison for sexually abusing boys on the Blackfeet reservation. The IHS has instituted new policies to try to prevent similar abuse in the future, but at least one expert is skeptical of the agency’s actions.

Montana Capitol dome, Helena.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A bill to change Montana's child sexual abuse laws, including lifting the statute of limitations for prosecuting such crimes, was signed Tuesday by Gov. Steve Bullock.

The bill, sponsored by Democratic Rep. Shane Morigeau, also extends from 21 to 27 the age deadline by which a victim of child sexual assault has to file a lawsuit against their abuser.

'Capitol Talk' is MTPR's weekly legislative analysis program.
Montana Public Radio

Tonight on Capitol Talk: Bills that are still alive, and bills that are gone at the midway point of the session. The effectiveness - and downside - of arguing "religious freedom" to get a bill passed. And the congressional delegation's tepid reaction to former Trump attorney Michael Cohen's testimony.

Montana lawmakers are proposing a bipartisan bill that would end the statute of limitations for prosecuting sex crimes committed against children. It would also extend the window for filing civil lawsuits against the perpetrator or others.

FRONTLINE and The Wall Street Journal investigate a pediatrician accused of sexually abusing Native American boys for years. This photograph was taken on the Blackfeet reservation in Browning, Montana.
Mike Shum / Wall Street Journal/FRONTLINE

In January in Great Falls, Stanley Weber, a former Indian Health Service pediatrician who worked on the Blackfeet Reservation in the 1990s was sentenced to 18 years in prison for sexually abusing boys in his care.

Tonight on MontanaPBS, the investigative news program "Frontline" will spend an hour detailing Weber’s story, and why it was allowed to go on for more than 20 years.

Joining us now is Chris Weaver, a Wall Street Journal reporter who worked with "Frontline" on the story.

'Capitol Talk' is MTPR's weekly legislative analysis program.
Montana Public Radio

This week at the Capitol: There's new momentum this legislative session to end Montana's statute of limitations in child sex abuse cases; Gov. Bullock remains vague about his political aspirations; the U.S. Supreme Court leaves Montana's campaign contribution limits in place; direct care workers may get a raise; and rallies to focus attention on missing and murdered Indigenous women coincide with possible legislative action. Learn more now on Capitol Talk with Sally Mauk, Rob Saldin and Holly Michels.

Gavel.
(PD)

GREAT FALLS, Mont. (AP) — A judge has sentenced a former Indian Health Services pediatrician convicted of molesting Native American boys to more than 18 years in prison.

U.S. District Judge Brian Morris also fined 70-year-old Stanley Patrick Weber $200,000 when he handed down the sentence for abusing several boys in his care on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation between 1992 and 1995.

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