MTPR

Scott Sales

It’s been just over a week since Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke was nominated to be secretary of Interior by President-elect Donald Trump. Since then, at least half-a-dozen Republicans and one Democrat have expressed interest in replacing him. If Zinke is confirmed by the Senate, Montana will hold a special election next year to fill his House seat.

To talk over what this means for Montana, we’re joined by Rob Saldin, a political science professor at the University of Montana and analyst for MTPR.

More than a half-dozen Republicans have expressed interest in running for Congressman Ryan Zinke’s seat if he confirmed as secretary of Interior next year. They include 29 year old State Representative Daniel Zolnikov of Billings. The three-term state representative says that he is most concerned about the national debt:

State Representative Amanda Curtis
Christopher B. Allen

State Representative Amanda Curtis of Butte is the first Democrat to indicate interest in replacing Congressman Ryan Zinke if he is confirmed as secretary of the Interior next year. Curtis says she’s not yet decided whether she’ll seek her party’s nomination, but says if Zinke is appointed,  it would a great opportunity for Democrats to take back the seat and that she has been encouraged to run by her supporters and family:

State Senator Scott Sales (R).
Michael Wright

Three more Montana Republicans have announced their intent to replace Congressman Ryan Zinke, if he is confirmed as Secretary of the Interior next year.

State legislators Scott Sales of Bozeman and Daniel Zolnikov of Billings, along with Corvallis resident Gary Carlson, who publishes a conservative newsletter online, all say they are interested the job.

Governor Bullock, with Budget Director Dan Villa. Governor Bullock released his revenue and spending plan Nov. 15 at the Capitol in Helena.
Corin Cates-Carney

The Bullock administration’s new budget released Tuesday outlines an increase in state spending of just over one percent over the next two years. This despite declining state revenue from the sales of coal, oil and gas.

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