Montana Public Radio

Rob Quist

Rob Quist talks with supporters during a campaign stop in Great Falls, April 11, 2017.
Eric Whitney

Democratic candidate for Congress Rob Quist today released his first quarter of 2017 fundraising total.

Can the governor's amendatory veto bring back the mail ballot option for the special election? We parse Quist's new TV ads and his decision not to participate in a public broadcasting statewide debate. We also discuss what Gianforte gains or loses by keeping a low profile. Then we look at how Tester's Gorsuch vote might affect his re-election chances next year. Finally, we remember the well-respected former Helena legislator Mignon Waterman who died this week.

U.S. House Candidates Greg Gianforte (L) and Rob Quist (R).
Corin Cates-Carney/Josh Burnham

At this point, there’s only one debate booked in the race for Montana’s U.S. House seat. Early voting starts May 1, the last day to vote is May 25. Montana Television Network has booked Democrat Rob Quist and Republican Greg Gianforte for a debate April 29.

MontanaPBS had been planning a statewide televised debate between Gianforte and Quist on May 1, but on Monday, that plan fell apart.

Congressional candidate Rob Quist is dealing with a flurry of bad press over his financial issues. Meanwhile, his opponent Greg Gianforte is laying low and raising more money than Quist. The vote by mail bill for the special election was killed by in the Montana Legislature where debates over bathrooms, taxes, and more are heating up as the session approaches its end date. Sally Mauk, Chuck Johnson and Rob Saldin dig in to this week's Montana politics news on "Capitol Talk."

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Bozeman Republican Greg Gianforte says he has raised about $1.5 million toward his campaign for Montana's only U.S. House seat.

The amount was double that raised by Democrat Rob Quist, a political newcomer from Creston, who announced Wednesday that he's received 18,000 campaign contributions totaling $750,000.

Reynermedia.com (CC-BY-2.0)

Montana Democrats are saying Republican U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte’s former company ran into tax trouble with Indiana. Republicans say that may be true, but has absolutely nothing to do with Gianforte.

Accusations of financial chicanery are flying in Montana’s U.S. House race.

Rob Quist.
Josh Burnham

Democratic U.S. House candidate Rob Quist is traveling around Montana holding rallies where he emphasizes  his stand on protecting public lands. He's also been in the news for unpaid debts and tax liens on his property.

MTPR's Sally Mauk talks with the nominee about his positions on everything from gun rights to healthcare and what he thinks of President Trump.

State revenue estimates have grown, but lawmakers are taking a cautious approach. Will the Legislature pass an infrastructure bill this session? A mail-voting hearing turns heated. And Sally and Chuck remember Bob Ream, on this episode of 'Capitol Talk.'

Rob Quist, Democratic candidate for U.S. House speaks during a campaign rally in Missoula on March 22, 2017.
Josh Burnham

About 150 people came to a campaign event in Missoula today for U.S. House Candidate Rob Quist. The Democrat called it a "rally for public lands."

Quist addressed the crowd on a warm, sunny afternoon, wearing his usual cowboy hat:

Greg Gianforte (L) and Rob Quist (R) are running for Congress in a special election to fill Ryan Zinke's seat.
MTPR News

Today news broke that the two major party candidates in Montana's special election for Congress have had tax liens filed against them in the past.

The Associated Press says that, "a group seeking to influence the May 25 special election" gave them information about liens against Democrat Rob Quist. The Democratic Party responded by providing information about Republican Greg Gianforte.

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