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rape

Bill Would Require Testing of All Sexual Assault Kits in Montana

Jan 15, 2019
Senate Bill 52 would require Montana crime labs to test all sexual assault kits collected from survivors.
UM Legislative News Service

HELENA — The Senate Judiciary Committee is considering a bill that would require Montana crime labs to test all sexual assault kits collected from survivors.

Sen. Diane Sands, D-Missoula, introduced the Senate Bill 52 before the committee on Tuesday.

Just months after settling a lawsuit over a sexual assault case, U.S. immigration officials today in Billings detained, and plan to deport, a man who entered the U.S. illegally.

The father of eight moved to Montana 20 years ago, and had no problem with customs – until now.

The Montana Capitol in Helena.
Mike Albans

This week, Congressman Ryan Zinke had his confirmation hearing this past week to become the next Secretary of the Interior. Assuming that Zinke is confirmed, Gov. Bullock will soon call a special election to fill Zinke's Congressional seat. Republican Ken Miller is the latest new candidate for this position.

Part of this week's conversation also includes a proposed bill that would set up long-term financing for future infrastructure projects by using coal tax money, and several bills aiming to update Montana's sexual assault statutes.

Lastly, the hosts discuss the women's marches taking place across the country the day after Trump's inauguration and whether this is the start of a long-term movement.

Join Sally Mauk, Chuck Johnson, and Rob Saldin now for this episode of  "Capitol Talk."

Montana Capitol dome, Helena.
William Marcus

Today, Montana Senators voted unanimously in support of a bill to change the state's legal definition of rape, removing the requirement of force for a perpetrator to be found guilty.

Montana Capitol, Helena, MT.
William Marcus

Today, lawmakers in a state Senate Judiciary Committee passed a largely bipartisan package of bills aiming to update laws on sexual crimes. But later, the committee split along party lines, shutting down efforts to change traffic laws.

Lawmakers in the Montana Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously to pass a bill out of committee that could change what Montana legally defines as rape, and remove force from that definition.

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