MTPR

poetry

"Bad Summon" explores the relationship between the majesty of nature and the quiet violence humans inflict upon themselves and others. The poems are dipped in loss, traveling between death and mountains, romance and rivers. They are addicted to the truth of experience and the energy behind regret. "Bad Summon" conjures its own ghost. According to David Baker, the judge who selected the winning manuscript, this is a “surprising, coherent, original collection of lyric poems. I felt peril, heartbreak, catastrophe, sorrow, genuine soulfulness. It’s also funny, yet its humor is not comic but possesses a terrible gravity.” This is a volume every poetry lover will want to explore.

The Bunch Grass Motel

Jan 23, 2018
Mary Beth Gloege

MUSING THE LOG CABIN

 

Some kitchen mornings

through time-warped window glass,

I saw mountain bluebirds

in their luminous coats

flutter and feed from post to post.

 

Living room afternoons

carried the whistles

and yeeps of robins,

harvesting fat earthworms

from fields of swaying grass.

 

Evenings above the cement stoop

held violet-green swallows,

darting swept-back wings

through the rising dark, rife

with star-shine and shadow.

 

"They do say women are most at risk of being beat up during the Super Bowl, statistically. So I was just thinking, when are men most dangerous? And it seems—I could put war in there—but when that kind of energy is clustered and then what does the Great Mother of the Animals think of that?" -- Melissa Kwasny

Once I entered the poems, hers was the only world I was certain of. Each poem reads almost like a chapter in a novel. There is softness, strength, and sureness in Rosie’s tellings. Try to stop after reading and savoring just one poem; go ahead, I dare you! —Patrice Vecchione, Step into Nature: Nurturing Imagination and Spirit in Everyday Life 

“Even if there are people in your life who don’t love you, the sky loves you, the ocean loves you, the land loves you. You are always connected to something that loves you.” -- Jennifer Finley

Book Cover / Copper Canyon Press

"When I heard back from the Tranströmers over a year or two later, one of the things that Monica was telling me was, 'Tomas was just so taken by the fact that you’re a working class guy.' And you know, no one’s ever thinking 'This’ll get me a seat at the table for a famous European poet: telling him that my dad’s a logger.' But I think it’s germane to my relationship to his work: he’s a working class guy raised by a single mother and he walked through the sub-zero streets of Stockholm every day to go to work. So I think putting your real foot forward is different than putting your best foot forward, and I think that’s how I made my connection with Tomas and his family. "  -- Michael McGriff

Poet Michael McGriff discusses his connection to Tomas Tranströmer as well as his latest book, "Early Hour," on this episode of The Write Question.

 

Skyhorse Publishing

When the Sea of Santiago appeared overnight in a cow pasture in Arkansas, it seemed, to some, a religious miracle. But to high school sophomore A.Z. McKinney, it's marked her chance to make history — as its first oceanographer. All she needs is to get out on the water.

Combining Bone Fishing And Poetry Into Memoir

Jul 5, 2017
Milkweed Editions

Chris Dombrowski was playing a numbers game: two passions — poetry and fly-fishing; one child, with another on the way; and an income hovering perilously close to zero. Enter, at this particularly challenging moment, a miraculous email: Can’t go, it’s all paid for, just book a flight to Miami. Thus began a journey that would lead to the Bahamas and to David Pinder, a legendary bonefishing guide.

'Spirit'

May 8, 2017
Cover Art: Russell Chatham "Hayfields on the Cottonwood Bench," 2004. Oil, 36" x 48". / Copper Canyon Press

by Jim Harrison

Rumi advised me to keep my spirit
up in the branches of a tree and not peek
out too far, so I keep mine in the very tall
willows along the irrigation ditch out back,
a safe place to remain unspoiled by the filthy
culture of greed and murder of the spirit.
People forget their spirits easily suffocate
so they must keep them far up in tree

'I Lost My Job & Wrote This Poem'

May 1, 2017
ClarkCountry.gov

No longer will I swallow hard boiled
instructions. No longer smile at
people I’d like to bite.
Today I am free.
Today I am Mick Jagger’s lips.
Today I am Kerouac’s touchdown in Lowell ’39.
Today I’m Jack Kennedy—ich bin ein unemployed!

There will be time later for assassins.
Today I am Lenin arriving at Finland Station
Napoleon back from Egypt.
Today I am Neville Chamberlain’s peace
Timothy Leary’s PhD
Joplin’s vocal chords
I am used up—but new
and yesterday was my last day of work.

Pages