MTPR

poetry

Rose Lincoln

"I think we all actually need poetry. We need the immersive experience in our humanity that poetic language can give us. We are all looking for these immersive experiences that allow us to contemplate what matters in our lives." -- Elisa New 

In this kinetic new poetry from Sherwin Bitsui, characters live in a state of fading and blurring, appearing as though photographed or filmed. Dissolve hums with the coexistence and dissonance of landscape and waste, crisis and continuity—with Navajo thought inherent to the movement of the book. Wielding one of the most deeply intuitive, uncompromising poetic voices of our time, Bitsui marries past and present, urban street and wilderness, "the afterbirth of sirens glistening over him."

Kathy Jones

"What Does Not Return, is a rare account of the experience we have come to call, rightly, care-giving. With ritual attentiveness, in small, deeply considered gestures, in words exchanged at the altar of grief, she shows us what it might mean to honor and celebrate what is given to us and what is taken away." -- Melissa Kwasny

Missoula Writing Collaborative

On August 20, 2018 at 4:30 p.m., board members of the Missoula Writing Collaborative installed the kiosk stand and laptop containing the Missoula Children’s Poetry Map in the children’s section of the Missoula Public Library. The digital map features more than 500 poems written by fourth-grade students about places in Missoula. Accompanying the poems are colorful drawings and recordings by the students. The poems cover well-known Missoula landmarks: the M and L trails, the North Hills, as well as lesser-known areas, such as Skyview Park, Rainbow Hill or Moose Can Gully. 

The map was a collaboration between Caroline Patterson, executive director of the Missoula Writing Collaborative, Ken Wall and Kyle Balke, President of Geodata Services, and Greg and Chris Robitaille of Xplorer Maps. It was funded by a $25,000 National Endowment Our Town Grant as well as a $10,000 grant from the Llewellyn Foundation. The Missoula Public Library and Missoula County Schools were also partners.

BkMk Press

"I think my voice. . .comes partly at least from things I’ve been told not to do in poetry. I feel like forever, throughout my life as a poet, I’m the type of person who if you tell me not to do something I will find a way to do it. But I’ll want to do it well so I can prove that the person who told me not to do it was wrong." --Henrietta Goodman

Zan Bockes

For the Lost

 

You’ve been turning right

at every corner; the sooty night

 

tangles your hair.  If the moon were out

you’d be making wishes, but doubt

 

strings lines across your eyes,

makes neon signs a disguise

 

for gold.  The wind is so cold it cuts

like dry ice wires, struts

 

and whips the newspapers down

the street in rolling stampede.  You drown

 

your teeth in Old Crow, bite

the sorrow on your tongue in two, tight

Red ruby embers burn,

Degradation in the form of creation,

It twists and winds and turns. 

-- Derek Hann

"Bad Summon" explores the relationship between the majesty of nature and the quiet violence humans inflict upon themselves and others. The poems are dipped in loss, traveling between death and mountains, romance and rivers. They are addicted to the truth of experience and the energy behind regret. "Bad Summon" conjures its own ghost. According to David Baker, the judge who selected the winning manuscript, this is a “surprising, coherent, original collection of lyric poems. I felt peril, heartbreak, catastrophe, sorrow, genuine soulfulness. It’s also funny, yet its humor is not comic but possesses a terrible gravity.” This is a volume every poetry lover will want to explore.

The Bunch Grass Motel

Jan 23, 2018
Mary Beth Gloege

MUSING THE LOG CABIN

 

Some kitchen mornings

through time-warped window glass,

I saw mountain bluebirds

in their luminous coats

flutter and feed from post to post.

 

Living room afternoons

carried the whistles

and yeeps of robins,

harvesting fat earthworms

from fields of swaying grass.

 

Evenings above the cement stoop

held violet-green swallows,

darting swept-back wings

through the rising dark, rife

with star-shine and shadow.

 

"They do say women are most at risk of being beat up during the Super Bowl, statistically. So I was just thinking, when are men most dangerous? And it seems—I could put war in there—but when that kind of energy is clustered and then what does the Great Mother of the Animals think of that?" -- Melissa Kwasny

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