Montana Public Radio

photography

When wildlife photographers enter an animal’s habitat, they have the potential to disrupt or even threaten an animal’s way of life. 

So does that mean it’s morally wrong to take a wildlife photo? 

Garrett Fisher

Driven by a love of glaciers and a need to see them before they disappear, Garrett Fisher piloted his 1949 antique airplane across the mountains of Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana, photographing remaining glaciers in the American Rockies.

Mike Lee

A Silhouette of Liberia is a collection of photographs Lee took in the mid-1970s in Liberia where he served with the Peace Corps. Lee’s soulful and haunting photographs reveal the conditions under which Liberians lived. Lee surrounds these photographs with stories of his experiences. By joining this narrative to his photographs, Lee will stir your imagination and transport you back to a time when Liberians lived in relative peace, though omens of Liberia’s violent future are subtext to many of his photographs. 

About the Author & Book:

People Of Yellowstone

Aug 29, 2017
Elm Grove

'People of Yellowstone' features 87 stunning portraits and real-life stories of the people who maintain Yellowstone National Park's wildness, lead expeditions, collect scientific data, wrangle horses, document seismic activity, study wildlife, rescue stranded hikers, and much more. Steve Horan spent more than five years photographing over 120 people who work in and around Yellowstone National Park. Award-winning writer Ruth W. Crocker interviewed each portrait subject, and her essays provide a narrative for Horan's photographs and details of each person’s experience in the park.

Barbara Van Cleve / University of New Mexico Press

In the vernacular of the West, the term Pure Quill means “authentic; real, through and through.” With her photographs of the West, which she knows and loves, Barbara Van Cleve gives vision to that term.
 

Barbara Van Cleve - All Rights Reserved

Barbara Van Cleve has been photographing ranch life since she was eleven years old. She grew up on her family’s cattle ranch near Big Timber, Montana. But she doesn’t just stand around holding a camera. More than a third of her images have been captured while she was riding a horse.

cover image credit : Tom Mangelson / Rizzoli Publications

Celebrating the most famous family of grizzly bears in the world — specifically matriarch 399 and her offspring — renowned nature photographer Thomas D. Mangelsen has been tracking and photographing these bruins of Greater Yellowstone for 10 years, amassing an incomparable portfolio that offers an intimate glimpse into the lives of this celebrated bear family.

Every day for many years, Tyler Knott Gregson has written a simple haiku about love, and posted it online. Since 2009, his poetry has attracted hundreds of thousands of online followers from around the world. His new book, All The Words Are Yours, presents Tyler’s favorite haiku poems, some previously unpublished, accompanied by his signature photographs, which capture the rich texture of daily life. This collection follows his first book, Chasers of the Light: Poems from the Typewriter Series, which was published in 2014

Letterman image: CBS PHOTO by John Paul Fil. ©2010 CBS BROADCASTING INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

In 2007, Whitefish writer and photographer Brian Schott had an idea. He wanted to start a print publication to feature the literature, art, and photography of mountain culture. And so, over pints of beer after a day on the ski slopes, he pitched his idea to a couple of friends: “We’ll publish some cool stories. It’ll be fun. Really!”

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.

In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund.