Montana Public Radio

philosophy

Gage Skidmore (CC-BY-20)

"When you’re tied to gratitude on the one hand and dependence on the other, it gives your ego less space to operate inside of your heart, mind and soul. This is very important in our market-driven, celebrity-centered culture where people primarily are concerned about being the next spectacle, the next image, the next exemplar of success that that reinforces the egoism and narcissism. No: we begin with revolutionary piety."

MIT Press

We have all heard that there are no longer any places left on Earth untouched by humans. The significance of this goes beyond statistics documenting melting glaciers and shrinking species counts. It signals a new geological epoch. In The Synthetic Age, Christopher Preston argues that what is most startling about this coming epoch is not only how much impact humans have had but, more important, how much deliberate shaping they will start to do.

Tonight's talk in the President's lecture series at the University of Montana is one of the many events cancelled because of today's blizzard - but the featured speaker did brave the elements today to sit down in our studios with News Director Sally Mauk. Avishai Margalit is an emeritus philosophy professor at Hebrew  University in Jerusalem, an author, and one of the foremost living philosophers, who has written extensively about the struggle between Islam and the West.