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parasitic wasps

Bug Bytes: Giant Ichneumon Wasps

Jun 16, 2020
Glenn Marangelo

Learning to identify different wasp species can be challenging, but it’s not brain surgery.

Well…actually, in this case it just might be.

We’re talking about giant ichneumon wasps – a genus of only four species in North America. Females range from 3-4 inches in length, including what appears to be a long, massive stinger. While intimidating looking, they’re harmless. This stinger is actually an ovipositor, used for laying eggs.

Bug Bytes: Voodoo Wasp

Jun 16, 2020
A moth caterpillar with pupae of the Braconid parasitoid wasp Glyptapanteles sp., more commonly known as the Voodoo wasp.
Professor José Lino-Neto / https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptapanteles#/media/File:Glyptapanteles.png

The more you learn about the insect world, you realize that the act of parasitism – where one species lives off of and feeds upon another species – is surprisingly common. This is especially true among wasps.

And while the act of parasitism may seem a bit gory, the details can be incredibly fascinating. In the case of a wasp commonly called the Voodoo wasp, it takes parasitism to an entirely new level by also controlling its victim’s behavior.

Bug Bytes: Tarantula hawk - Pepsis wasp

Jun 15, 2020
An examples of Pepsis formosa, more commonly known as the tarantula hawk.
Glenn Marangelo

The deserts of the southwestern United States are home to some remarkable animals. One kind of creepy crawly often associated with this region is the tarantula. With several species growing to the size of an adult human’s hand, they are certainly impressive.

But what’s even more impressive is an aerial predator called the tarantula hawk. While images of a feathered predator with talons might pop to mind, tarantula hawks are actually wasps.

Stump Stabber

Jul 18, 2014
Richard Bartz

"Giant Ichneumon Wasp," by Christine Wren.