MTPR

Montana Supreme Court

Dartmouth College and Stanford University today apologized for a controversial Montana campaign mailer. They’ll send follow-up letters to the 100,000 people who got that mailer, telling them to ignore it. Those letters are supposed to arrive before election day.
 
"I think it’s a good first step," says Linda McCulloch, Montana's Secretary of State. "I think it’s a good pre-election step."

Update 10/28/14
Read the apology letter from Stanford and Dartmouth here

Lawyers representing Stanford University spoke with Montana’s commissioner of political practices today about a controversial campaign mailer.

That flyer, sent to about 100,000 Montanans last week, used the state seal without permission, and purports to show the political leanings of those running for two seats on the state supreme court. Supreme court races in Montana are by law non-partisan.

Wheat, VanDyke Clash Over Partisanship In Supreme Court Race

Oct 19, 2014
Jessie Mazur

The Montana Supreme Court could have decided one of this year’s election campaigns long before November – a race for a seat on that very court.

In April, a district judge struck Solicitor General Lawrence VanDyke’s name from the ballot after ruling he had not been admitted to the bar at least five years prior to the November election.

In the 2014 general election in Montana, perhaps the most interesting statewide race is for a seat on the state supreme court. The winner will make decisions about the constitutional rights of all Montanans.

In this episode of "Home Ground Radio", Brian Kahn sits down with incumbent Montana Supreme Court Justice Mike Wheat. They talk about judicial philosophy, the role of judges, judicial elections, and money in politics.

There are pretty sharp differences in the candidates running for the two Montana Supreme Court seats being contested this fall. They came out at a candidate forum in Missoula on Tuesday.

One of the big issues at the forum was campaign financing, both for this year’s Supreme Court race and for elections in general.

The candidates talked about the 2010 Citizens United case in the US Supreme Court. It allowed unlimited independent corporate spending in federal elections. The high court applied that ruling to state elections in 2012.

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