MTPR

Montana Department of Environmental Quality

Gravel mine, file photo.
(PD)

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality is seeking public comment on a proposed gravel pit four miles east of Seeley Lake.

Deer Creek Excavating, LLC, has applied to mine gravel on a 26.5-acre site known as the Cottonwood Pit. A similar application from a different company to mine the Cottonwood Pit drew opposition from locals at the county level last year.

Lake Koocanusa
Darren Kirby (CC-BY-SA-3)

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new modeling framework for collection and analysis of selenium data in Lake Koocanusa.

The framework is designed to organize data collected by different agencies using different protocols, with a long-term goal of helping managers develop a common water quality standard for selenium levels in Lake Koocanusa, which straddles the international border.

Sound-Off On Proposed Black Butte Mine Project

Oct 23, 2017
Alan Kirk, mine permitting manager, and Bob Jacko, vice president of operations for Tintina show plans for the Black Butte Mine in July 2015.
Steve Jess

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality is adding an additional public scoping meeting for the proposed Black Butte copper mine outside White Sulphur Springs. That brings the number of scheduled meetings to four.

The first is October 30 in Great Falls. The second will be November 1 in White Sulphur Springs. The third, and newly scheduled meeting will be held in Helena on Monday, November 6. The fourth meeting will be in Livingston on Tuesday, November 7.

Uptown Butte, MT.
Josh Burnham

In Butte, the Environmental Protection Agency now says it's going to take a closer look at a neglected part of the big Superfund site there. But work at another remains stalled. Nora Saks got an update on what is and isn't happening with cleaning up in Butte from David McCumber editor of the Montana Standard.

The Kootenai Bridge over Lake Koocanusa from the east bank.
David M. Carson (CC-BY-SA-4)

 Editor's note: We've corrected part of this story. Read below.

Coal mines in Canada have been sending a harmful heavy metal downstream to northwest Montana for years, but state, tribal, federal and Canadian agencies all have different standards for how much is too much. Those agencies are meeting this week, and speaking with the public to try to come up with common standards.

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