MTPR

Missing and Murdered Indigneous Women

Funding For Missing Persons Bill Remains In Limbo

Mar 12, 2019
A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Montana lawmakers are no closer to agreeing on who should fund a missing persons bill after a hearing Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

House Bill-21, or “Hanna’s Act” is named for a Northern Cheyenne woman who was murdered in 2013. The bill would create a position in the Montana Department of Justice to investigate every missing persons case across the state, in an attempt to bridge gaps in communication and jurisdiction between state, tribal and federal agencies.

A sign from a Jan. 9, 2019 missing and murdered Indigenous women vigil in Missoula.
Josh Burnham / Montana Public Radio

Human remains found last year on northwestern Montana’s Blackfeet Indian Reservation do not belong to a 20-year-old woman missing for almost two years.

The FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Virginia announced Friday that its analysis of the remains found December 13 are not those of Ashley Loring HeavyRunner who disappeared in June of 2017.

The President of the Fort Belknap Assiniboine (Nakoda) and Gros Ventre (Aaniiih) Tribes Andrew Werk Jr. delivered the State of Tribal Nations Address, in the House chamber on Thurs., Feb. 7. 2019.
Corin Cates-Carney / MTPR

Native American leaders asked Montana lawmakers Thursday for help passing legislation important to tribes across the state. 

The President of the Fort Belknap Assiniboine (Nakoda) and Gros Ventre (Aaniiih) Tribes Andrew Werk Jr. delivered the State of Tribal Nations Address in the House chamber Thursday.

CSKT Policy Analyst Jami Pluff is spearheading the formation of a work group to address missing and murdered indigenous women and girls on the Flathead Reservation. Jan. 7, 2019.
Nicky Ouellet / MTPR

As Congress and Montana lawmakers consider laws to address high rates of missing and murdered Native American women and girls, people in Indian Country have a question for the law enforcement officers and government officials tasked with protecting them.

Briana Lamb and Senator Jon Tester
Courtesy Senator Tester's office

Among those at the State of the Union address in Washington, DC last night was was a 29-year-old stay-at-home mother of two from Missoula. Briana Lamb is also an activist on the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women. She was Senator Jon Tester’s guest.

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