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Matt Rosendale

Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale.
Eric Whitney / MTPR

A pair of campaign watchdog groups says they’re filing complaints with federal authorities over alleged illegal coordination between the NRA and the Republican candidate for Senate in Montana.

The Campaign Legal Center and former Arizona Representative Gabby Giffords’ political organization are asking the Federal Election Commission to investigate what Candidate Matt Rosendale says in a recording released this week by The Daily Beast.

Montana Green Party's Ballot Benefactor May Remain Unknown

Sep 14, 2018
Montana Green Party
Montana Green Party

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Whoever bankrolled the effort to qualify the Montana Green Party for this year's state ballot may get away with remaining unknown because the state's campaign disclosure laws do not address anonymous groups funding certain signature gatherers.

Democrats are accusing the Republican U.S. Senate candidate Matt Rosendale of illegally coordinating with the National Rifle Association After this audio recording was posted on The Daily Beast Web site. (Click play above to listen)

Eric Whitney: The muddy audio lasts 54 seconds, and in it Matt Rosendale tells an unidentified person that he expected the NRA to buy media ads in support of his campaign against Democratic U.S. Senator Jon Tester. John Adams, editor of the Montana Free Press website has been following up on the story. John thanks for joining us on Montana Public Radio.

According to an audio recording obtained by the Daily Beast , Republican Montana State Auditor and U.S. Senate candidate Matt Rosendale may have illegally coordinated with a top NRA official prior to the conservative gun rights group spending nearly $400,000 on ads attacking Rosendale’s opponent, Democratic U.S. Sen. Jon Tester.

Rosendale’s campaign denies the charges and says the candidate was referring to the pro-gun group’s endorsement in the hotly contested 2018 Senate race.

AP Fact Check: Tester Did Rank No. 1 In Cash From Lobbyists

Sep 10, 2018
Senator Jon Tester.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Republicans say in a television ad that Montana U.S. Sen. Jon Tester has taken more money from lobbyists than any other member of Congress this election cycle as he seeks to fend off a challenge from Republican State Auditor Matt Rosendale.

Trump rallies in Montana again hoping to defeat Jon Tester's bid for re-election — and it's personal. New campaign ads in the House and Senate races stretch the truth. And Governor Bullock shifts position on guns as he ponders a run for president. These stories and more tonight on "Campaign Beat," MTPR's weekly political analysis program.

Rosie Costain

Senator Jon Tester held an ice cream social Friday at the University of Montana to encourage students to vote. He also fielded questions about issues surrounding November’s election.

The event was billed as a chance for Senator Tester to hear from students about issues they care about and talk about the upcoming election. That’s exactly what happened when Tester stepped to the front of the room of about 60 people in the University Center on the University of Montana campus.

Tester also tried to appeal to students by talking about the rising cost of college.

Some Montana farmers are hoping to hear some good news on trade as President Donald Trump brings his campaign to Billings tonight.

U.S. Supreme Court
Flickr user: Marty Stone (CC-BY-NC-2)


Senator Jon Tester says he hasn’t yet decided on whether he’ll vote to confirm U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

"Before I make a final decision on Judge Kavanaugh, however, I’ll need to look at him face to face, read his body language, ask him tough questions on behalf of Montana," Tester says.

Sen. Jon Tester
U.S. Senate

Senator Jon Tester today had three Montana men who say they’ve long supported the Republican Party on a conference call with journalists, to say that this year, they’re supporting the Democratic senator in his re-election campaign.

“He’s looking out for the little person, and the Republican Party’s stopped doing that,” Mick Ringsak said.

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