MTPR

Keystone XL pipeline

Judge: TransCanada Must Study Modified Keystone XL Route

Aug 16, 2018
The proposed Keystone XL pipeline would cross the Missouri near this spot, less than two miles downstream of the Fort Peck Dam spillway and just a few miles upstream from the Fort Peck Indian Reservation boundary.
Erika Peterman

A federal judge in Great Falls on Wednesday ordered the U.S. Department of State to update its environmental assessment of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline to reflect changes in the pipeline’s route through Nebraska.

District Judge Brian Morris’ 13-page partial order is a temporary win for environmental and indigenous rights groups who sued the federal government under the National Environmental Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act.

Pipes for Keystone XL Pipeline.
shannonpatrick17 (CC-BY-2.0)

A federal judge in Great Falls today heard arguments in a lawsuit to overturn federal approval for the Keystone XL pipeline to cross from Alberta into Montana.

Northern Plains Resource Council member and lawsuit declarant Dena Hoff outside of Missouri River Federal Courthouse on May 24, 2018.
Northern Plains Resource Council

Groups suing to stop the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline made their arguments in federal court in Great Falls Thursday. They’re asking a judge to void the Trump administration’s permit approving the project crossing the U.S.- Canada border.

Demonstrators March Ahead Of Keystone XL Hearing

May 24, 2018
Keystone XL opponents gather in Great Falls, MT, Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
Hunter Pauli - Montana Free Press

Opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline gathered at Riverside Park in Great Falls on Wednesday in support of environmental and indigenous justice groups suing the U.S. government in federal court to stop the pipeline.

Protesters in Great Falls, Montana rally in opposition to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, May 23, 2018.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Protesters are marching in Great Falls this evening to rally opposition to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. The event was organized by groups suing in federal court to overturn the Trump Administration's presidential permit for the pipeline to run from Alberta, Canada across Northeast Montana, down to Nebraska.

Keystone Pipeline pumping station in Nebraska.
Flickr user shannonpatrick17 http://bit.ly/2H4u5Kk (CC-BY-2) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It’s springtime in Montana and that’s keeping Glendive-area farmer Dena Hoff plenty busy these days:

"Oh yes, we’re lambing. It’s been crazy," Hoff says.

Hoff, an irrigated farmer on the Yellowstone River, is also keeping tabs on the Trump administration's activities in Washington D.C. Hoff is particularly disappointed by the President’s decision last week to approve a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline:

More than a dozen Fort Peck tribal members and veterans plan to traverse nearly 100 miles across the reservation to raise awareness about the potential dangers of the Keystone XL pipeline.
Courtesy Marina Starr

Hours before the Trump administration issued permits to resurrect the Keystone XL pipeline Friday morning a group on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana set out on a prayer walk to protest the pipeline.

Gov. Bullock entering the House chambers before his State of the State speech Tuesday, January 24, 2017 in Helena.
Freddy Monares - UM Legislative News Service

Gov. Steve Bullock outlined his goals for the 2017 Legislature Tuesday during his third State of the State address, including a responsible state budget, infrastructure, business growth and education.

Climate Activists Debate Over Tactics

May 3, 2016
About 60 people gathered on the Yellowstone County Courthouse lawn to promote renewable energy. The March 29, 2016 rally was sponsored by the Northern Plains Resource Council.
Jackie Yamanaka - Yellowstone Public Radio

The debate about whether or not humans are warming the planet is essentially over – 97 percent of climate scientists agree that we are. But the debate over tactics, about how to reduce our carbon emissions, is just starting to heat up.

Ken Ilgunas, author of "Trespassing Across America:  One Man’s Epic, Never-Done-Before (and sort of illegal) Hike Across the Heartland."
Courtesy

In September 2012, Ken Ilgunas stuck out his thumb in Denver, Colorado, and hitchhiked 1,500 miles north to the Alberta tar sands. After being duly appalled, he commenced hiking the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, from Alberta to the Texas Gulf Coast.

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