Montana Public Radio

jobs

Screen capture from a Montana Department of Labor & Industry FAQ page about unemployment benefits. http://dli.mt.gov/self-employed-contractors
Montana Department of Labor & Industry

Hundreds of recipients of unemployment insurance through the federal CARES Act are now being asked to give that money back. 

The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program is designed for gig workers, the self-employed and other groups not normally eligible for unemployment benefits. The Bozeman Chronicle reported Thursday that recipients are now receiving bills, some for more than $10,000. 

'For Rent' sign in front of a house.
iStock

Amid job losses that haven’t fully recovered this year because of the pandemic recession, competition in many of Montana’s housing markets is also on the rise. That means many Montanans are struggling to find and keep housing.

Montana State Senate
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Montana Republicans' dominance on election day included winning a stronger conservative majority in the statehouse for the 2021 legislative session. Republicans appear to have flipped several seats in Montana’s House of Representatives, and at least one seat in the state Senate, making the Republican majority in both chambers ironclad.

Maureen Lonergan, Director of Global Training and Certification for Amazon Web Services, or AWS.
courtesy

What are the skills major tech companies are looking for in their workforce? What do businesses get for their investment in employee training? What type of workforce are we imagining for our economy a decade from now?

Learn more now with Can Do.

Sign on a business door saying 'Our Dining Room Is Closed. Order take-out, drive through or for pickup or delivery.
iStock

It’s almost that time of year when businesses staff up for the holidays and winter season. But with the pandemic and recession, seasonal hiring will look different in Montana.

Individually, our decisions about where to live and what to do for work shape our lives profoundly. The way Montanans answer those questions collectively, quite literally defines the future of our state. Montana has plenty of selling points. Whether you're a fifth generation resident or a new arrival who's lived here six months. But the limits of our rural economy, like lower wages and fewer jobs in specialized fields, are also downsides. This state of ours is a great place to live. But it can be a hard place to make a living. And of course, if you're a politician looking for votes, that's a natural thing to campaign on.

Learn more now on Share State episode six, "Desiring to Improve The Quality of Life."

Montana’s governor says the state’s employment rate is in a healthier place compared to many other states after the coronavirus pandemic led to government mandated business closures earlier this year.

Some economists say it’s too soon to draw conclusions.

Governor Steve Bullock says Montana Department of Labor and Industry data show that the state has the sixth fastest job bounce back in the country.

The Montana Department of Labor and Industry issued more than 55,000 unemployment payments totaling $60 million last week.

The total includes regular unemployment payments, expanded pandemic assistance and the $600 weekly addition from the federal CARES Act.

Dec. 2019 vs. April 2020 Forecast Comparison - Total Employment (thousands).
UM Bureau of Business and Economic Research

An economic downturn of greater magnitude than that seen in 2008 recession could be felt in Montana in the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic. That’s according to a preliminary analysis from the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Montana.

The report released Tuesday forecasts the Montana economy in 2020 could see employment drop 7.3 percent, a loss of more than 50,000 jobs.

A screen capture from Montana's unemployment website, montanaworks.gov, April 01, 2020, telling visitors the unemployment office is experiencing unprecedented call volumes and directing visitors to more resources.
montanaworks.gov

The number of Montanans filing for unemployment continues to rise. More than 64,000 people in the state have filed a claim for benefits since the first case of the novel coronavirus was reported in Montana in mid March.

The new unemployment filings equate to almost 6 percent of Montana’s population.

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