MTPR

Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research

Preliminary 2018 Nonresident Traveler Expenditures
Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research

A proposal to add an additional 1 percent to the resort tax that nine Montana towns are allowed to levy got initial approval Monday.

The 1 percent optional resort tax increase passed its first vote in the Senate 33-16. The tax would fund infrastructure projects in tourism-impacted towns.

Tourists at the Apgar Visitor Center in Glacier National Park.
GlacierNPS (PD)

Montana saw a small decline in out-of-state visitors in 2018, but an increase in overall tourism spending.

Jeremy Sage is the assistant director of the Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research at the University of Montana, which released the report.

Number of resident trips and spending to travel regions, 2017.
University of Montana Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research

Montanans spent more than $2.8 billion on in-state trips last year according to a new report from the University of Montana’s Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research.

The study looked at day and overnight trips for leisure, business, and other reasons that took people at least 50 miles away from their homes.

Widlfire smoke fills the sky in Seeley Lake August  7, 2017.
Eric Whitney

A new study says Montana lost close to a quarter of a billion dollars in tourist revenue this year due to a tough fire season. That’s based on a survey of tourists by the University of Montana's Institute for Tourism and Recreational Research.

"For every hundred visitors that came to Montana this summer, about eight to nine other visitors cancelled their trips because of the smoke," Associate Director Jeremy Sage says.

Yellowstone National Park's east entrance.
Diane Renkin, National Park Service

A proposed national park fee increase from $30 to $70 for a seven-day pass likely will negatively affect the gateway communities near the parks, according to a new study by the University of Montana.

The U.S. Department of the Interior recently announced its plan to increase fees in 17 of the most-visited national parks in response to a nearly $12 billion backlog due to deferred maintenance. Yellowstone and Glacier parks are on the list for the fee increase.

Overview of tourist spending in Montana.
University of Montana Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research

Montana’s budget to entice tourists to the state is about to take a multimillion dollar hit. Next week, budget reductions triggered by lower than expected state revenue will make Montana less competitive, officials say.

Last year, tourists spent about $3.5 billion in Montana, according to the University of Montana’s Institute for Tourism and Recreation.

Georgia Smies, an aquatic biologist for the Flathead Tribes, plays a game about the impacts of aquatic invasive species with students from Lolo
Nicky Ouellet

This week, the shore of the lower Flathead River west of Ronan is the biggest classroom in Montana. Fourth and fifth graders from across western Montana are here for the River Honoring, an annual event hosted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, where they learn about the plants and animals native to the reservation.

2016 non-resident expenditure allocation by category.
UM Institute of Tourism and Recreation Research

Montana’s tourism industry saw more people last year, but fewer dollars.

That’s according to the latest update released today by the Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research at the University of Montana.

In 2016 about 12.5 million out of state visitors came to Montana, that’s up 3 percent over 2015.

Tourists Taking Photos at Sacred Dancing Cascades in Glacier National Park.
Glacier National Park/Jacob W. Frank (PD)

Last year’s tourism numbers were up almost 8 percent over 2014. Almost 12 million out-of-state travelers visited Montana in 2015, but those tourists didn’t spend as much money as they have in previous years.

Corin Cates-Carney

I’m Corin Cates-Carney at the tenth annual pond skip at the Whitefish Mountain Resort.

A large pool waits for skiers and snowboards at the bottom of the mountainside runway. The goal is to skip across the icy water, dressed in costume, with prizes awarded to those who make it, and those who don’t, but fail in style.

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