MTPR

Guy Baker

Jermain Austin Charlo has been missing for exactly a year as of Sunday. But her family hopes that answers are on the way. That's because the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes recently increased their reward for information on her disapearance.

L to R: Ravalli County Drug Detective Scott Burlingham, Flathead County Sheriff Brian Heino and Missoula City Police Detective Guy Baker during a Missoula meeting about meth with Sen. Steve Daines, April 18, 2019.
Edward O'Brien / Montana Public Radio

Last week Montana’s Republican Sen. Steve Daines hosted a roundtable in Missoula to talk with police and prosecutors about the devastating toll methamphetamine is taking on western Montana. The event also offered a revealing look at the business end of the meth trade.

L to R: Missoula County Sheriff TJ McDermott, Sen. Steve Daines and Lake County Sheriff Don Bell during a Missoula meeting about meth, April 18, 2019.
Edward O'Brien / Montana Public Radio

Montana’s Republican U.S. Senator was in Missoula Thursday. He invited police and prosecutors to share their concerns about Montana’s meth crisis.

Sen. Steve Daines wanted straight talk on methamphetamine’s impacts on western Montana. Regional law enforcement gave him plenty to chew on.

Rep. Kimberly Dudik (D) Missoula.
Montana Legislature

Montana lawmakers are considering a bill that would deal with one of the worst side effects of the oil boom in Eastern Montana: the trafficking of women and underage girls for prostitution.

Stephanie Anderson, who describes herself as a sex trafficking victim told the House Judiciary Committee about her introduction to the sex trade.

A workshop Thursday at Salish Kootenai College in the Mission Valley features two advocates who work with both the victims of human trafficking, and those who perpetrate the crime.

MTPR's Edward O'Brien talks with Missoula Police Detective Guy Baker, a member of the FBI's Montana Regional Violent Crime Task Force, and Kat Werner, who manages YWCA Missoula's domestic and sexual violence program.

Baker says trafficking is so pervasive because "there's a lot of money to be made."