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guns

Pistol stock photo.
(PD)

The Montana Supreme Court today ruled that a Missoula ordinance that would have expanded background checks to private gun sales violates state law. The opinion overturns a lower court’s ruling, and sides with Attorney General Tim Fox's position. 

Updated 5 P.M. Oct. 22, 2019

The Billings Police Department detained two juveniles Tuesday afternoon after a report of a person with a gun sent Billings Senior High School into lockdown for over an hour.

A man holding an AR-style rifle.
iStock

Nearly two dozen U.S. Senate Democrats are planning a marathon floor session this Tuesday evening to speak out on what they call congressional inaction on gun violence. Montana’s Democratic Senator, Jon Tester, won’t be among them. But Tester says it's long past time the Senate take up gun violence legislation.

Police car.
(PD)

Missoula police are investigating an early morning shooting on the city’s south side. Detective Sergeant Eric Stevenson says multiple gunshots were reported fired in the 2,600 block of Garland Drive just before 4 a.m. Monday.

No one was injured.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has prohibited nearly all parishioners from carrying lethal weapons on church property.

Prior to the shift in policy, having a weapon on church grounds was considered "inappropriate."

The change was revealed in an update to a handbook sent electronically to local church leaders over the weekend.

Pistol stock photo.
(PD)

The inaugural Jeremy Bullock Safe Schools Summit held in Butte this week brought around 150 teachers, school administrators, law enforcement and mental health workers together to talk through the growing concern about violence in schools. The summit is named after Jeremy Bullock, an 11-year-old boy shot and killed on a school playground in Butte 25 years ago.

Montana Public Radio's Corin Cates-Carney spoke with Jeremy's parents Robin and Bill Bullock during the convention this week.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

With their hopes fading that lawmakers in Washington will pass new gun safety measures, young activists from March for Our Lives have their own plans on how to stem gun violence.

Bill Bullock stands on a stage at a Butte convention center, August 20, 2019 during the first Jeremy Bullock Safe School Summit. Jeremy, Bill's son, was shot and killed on the playground of Margaret Leary Elementary, in Butte, in the spring of 1999.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Twenty-five years ago, 11-year-old Jeremy Bullock was shot by a classmate on the playground of Butte’s Margaret Leary Elementary. It was reportedly the youngest school shooting death in U.S. history at the time. 

Strong majorities of Americans from across the political spectrum support laws that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to temporarily remove guns from a person who is seen to be a risk to themselves or others, according to a new APM Research Lab/Guns & America/Call To Mind survey.

Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET

On the presidential campaign trail in Iowa and on the op-ed page of The New York Times, former Vice President Joe Biden has made the case for going back to a nationwide ban on assault weapons and making it "even stronger."

Some have reacted with quizzical expressions: "Back?" "Stronger?"

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