Montana Public Radio

Fort Peck Reservation

Imagery from NOAA geostationary (GOES) satellites, March 2, 2018 shows more snow on the way to Montana.
NOAA

Members of the state legislature’s American Indian Caucus are urging Montanans to donate money and help people impacted by extreme winter weather.

In an opinion column published in the Missoulian Friday, all 10 members of the Montana American Indian Caucus liken the plight of people caught in blizzards on three Native American reservations to that of farmers and ranchers facing drought and wildfire last summer.

A sprawling, private nature reserve in northeastern Montana will host its first ever bison hunt early next year. But if you want to harvest a bison on the American Prairie Reserve, you either need to live near the reserve or be ready to pony up a lot of cash.  

Teresa Brockie, the first Native American instructor to be on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, was inducted this month as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing.
Courtesy

Teresa Brockie, the first Native American instructor to be on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, was inducted this month as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. It’s an acknowledgment of the White Clay tribal member's contribution to public health research.

Originally from Hays, on the Fort Belknap Reservation, Teresa Brockie is best known for drawing connections between historical trauma in Native American communities and adverse health effects later in life, like suicide risk and drug use.

The Wolf Point School District is facing a complaint of discrimination against its Native American students for the second time in the past 15 years. Last week, the Fort Peck Tribes filed what’s called a Title VI complaint with the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education on behalf of their children.

Yellowstone Public Radio’s Brie Ripley and Montana Public Radio’s Nicky Ouellet team up to bring us this story.

Why Yellowstone Culled More Than 1,200 Bison This Season

Apr 16, 2017
A bison sculpture in Three Forks, Montana
Eric Whitney

On NPR's All Things Considered Sunday, Amy Martin reported on the second-largest ever cull of Yellowstone Bison this winter.

More than 1,200 bison were killed, more than at any time since 2007-2008.

More than a dozen Fort Peck tribal members and veterans plan to traverse nearly 100 miles across the reservation to raise awareness about the potential dangers of the Keystone XL pipeline.
Courtesy Marina Starr

Hours before the Trump administration issued permits to resurrect the Keystone XL pipeline Friday morning a group on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana set out on a prayer walk to protest the pipeline.

Bison at the Stephens Creek Capture facility north of Yellowstone Park in 2015.
Jim Peaco - NPS (PD)

On Monday the Bozeman Daily Chronicle's Michael Wright reported that more than 570 Yellowstone National Park bison have been killed so far this winter. The Park is trying to reduce the size of its bison herd from an estimated 5,500 animals to about 3,000.

The annual slaughter happens as part of compromise between the Park Service and State of Montana, which says bison numbers need to be controlled to prevent the spread of the disease brucellosis to cattle. It's controversial, and there is an alternative.

Joining us now to talk about it is Amy Martin, who spent the last year reporting on bison for her podcast: Threshold.

Threshold Episode 04: Tatanka Oyate

Feb 23, 2017

In episode four of Threshold, we meet Robbie Magnan of the Fort Peck Tribes. He believes his community can prosper in the future by reconnecting with their roots as the Tatanka Oyate — the buffalo people. Magnan has built a quarantine facility that could be an alternative to the Yellowstone bison slaughter, but right now it sits empty while more than a thousand bison are being culled from the herd. Why? We'll learn more about Magnan's vision for bison restoration, and investigate why some people are opposed to it.

Bison being released at Fort Peck Reservation, November 2014.
Courtesy of the Defenders of Wildlife

Tribal members and wildlife groups were among those asking lawmakers today to consider a bill to change how bison can be moved and sold. The bill proposed by Rep. Willis Curdy, a Missoula Democrat, would remove an existing requirement for wild bison be cleared as free from brucellosis before being transferred.

U.S. House candidates Denise Juneau and Ryan Zinke stand on stage at Frazer High School for their first debate on August 29, 2016
Jackie Yamanaka - Yellowstone Public Radio

The first debate between Montana’s major party candidates for its lone seat in the U.S. House was last night. It was colored by both national politics and the very local concerns of the community that hosted it — the tiny town of Frazer on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in northeast Montana.

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