MTPR

flowers

Glacier Lilies: Enchanting Yellow Lights Of Spring

May 7, 2019
Glacier lillies in Missoula.
By Forest Service Northern Region from Missoula, MT, USA - Glacier Lily, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46638997

"Glacier lilies set standards in beauty and cultural importance. These charming flowers are the lights of spring, indicators of winter’s end, symbols of nutrition, yellow images of patience and longevity, and for me, a new and solid representation of pure human enchantment."

'Field Notes': Camas Bulbs Below The Snow

Mar 4, 2019
Camas flower.
Flickr user born1945 (CC-BY-2)

On a recent early winter morning I am cross-country skiing along the trails at Lolo Pass in the Bitterroot Mountains. As I glide along Packer Meadows in the breaking dawn, I think about early summer when this is a wet meadow awash with a sea of camas blooms.

The camas, or Camassia quamash, produce blue-violet six-petaled flowers on stalks rising above the main stems. They bloom so profusely and in such numbers that they can look like a pool of water.

'Field Notes:' The Fruits Of Fire

Jun 10, 2018
 A forested area 5 years after a fire.
NPS - Stephanie Metzler (PD)

Have you ever walked around in a recently burned forest? One of those areas where perhaps last summer you saw flames leaping out or smoke billowing? If not, I urge you to go out and take a look at this unique environment. I had never spent any time in a burned forest until a few years ago. I was immediately impressed with the beauty and abundant life I found in this transformed forest.

Bitterroot flowers Along the Nez Perce National Historic Trail, Lolo, MT.
U.S. Forest Service (PD)

Enter the high country of Montana in late May or early June and you may see a striking pale pink flower. Few plants can rival the lovely bloom of the bitterroot, a low-growing perennial herb with a blossom that ranges from deep rose to almost white.

The bitterroot grows on the dry slopes of the Rockies, ranging from southern British Columbia and Alberta to the high-altitude deserts of New Mexico and Arizona.

'Field Notes': Flowers & The Fibonacci Sequence

Jul 4, 2016
Black-eyed Susan
Jason Hollinger (CC-BY-2)

It's summer, and wildflowers are dotting the hillsides and forests. You might find yourself plucking petals off those flowers, trying to determine if he loves your or she loves you not. If you're a hopeless romantic who repeats this ritual year after year, you will notice a happy coincidence — more often than not, he or she loves you. This could only mean one thing (besides that you're worthy of adoration). Empirically speaking, this means that more often than not, flowers have an odd number of petals.

'The Time of Irises'

Mar 21, 2016
cc: Gertrud K

by Jennifer Fallein

There is the dark one
with that sheen
of fluorescent green
the impossible color
of a male mallard's neck in sun.
And there is the salmon one

Flickr user, Audrey

Passionflower is a beautiful climbing vine native to the Americas whose corona reminded people of the crown of thorns worn by Jesus during his crucifixion. It's a sedative, milder than valerian or kava - often, you'll find it used in combination with other calming herbs like lemon balm. Passionflower calms the nervous system, reduces anxiety, and soothes insomnia and muscle spasms. Scientists think it increases levels of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. Don't use passionflower if you're pregnant or breastfeeding; it's a uterine stimulant that can over-sedate your baby.

David Dickerson

Medicinal use of datura - also known as moonflower - is so ancient, no one is sure where the plant originated. Two important nervous system depressor drugs, atropine and scopolamine, are derived from it. Oracles in the Americas and Greece used it for divinations. Witches in medieval Europe applied it to their skin in ointments. And when modern-day researchers experimented (a risky proposition; one of the researchers died) with those old witches' recipes, they reported intense dreams of flying. Broomstick, anyone?

Echinacea

Jul 19, 2014

When taken as herbal medicine, echinacea stimulates our immune systems, raising white blood cell counts and strengthening cell walls. Although it originated in North America, where native Americans used echinacea as something of a cure-all, in the 20th century, Germany is where its popularity first surged. People use echinacea to shorten the duration of the common cold and reduce the symptoms, and to boost immunity and fight off upper respiratory infections.

Cinchona

Jan 24, 2014

January 25th, 2014: Cinchona is the national tree of Peru and Ecuador. Its bark contains the alkaloid quinine, which since the 1600s, has been used to treat the fever and chills of malaria.

http://www.floradelaterre.com/