MTPR

Education

C.R. Anderson Middle School in Helena.
Dan Boyce

There’s a potential problem with how Montana determines which schools will get special assistance under the replacement for the federal No Child Left Behind law. It’s with how schools handle basic student attendance records.

Leaders of Montana’s K-12 public schools system will update state lawmakers Thursday morning about progress on rolling out the replacement for the federal No Child Left Behind Act following cuts to education funding last year.

The Office of Public Instruction plans to brief lawmakers on the schools identified this spring as the lowest performing five percent in the state.

On this "Episode of Can Do: Lessons from Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs," Michael Braun, professor of management and marketing at the University of Montana, discusses what young entrepreneurs need to know when starting a company in a technology-fueled industry.

Whitefish Middle School.
Josh Burnham

One week after students across Montana walked out of class to advocate for safer schools, parents, teachers and school administrators in Whitefish are proposing safety upgrades to the district's public schools

The Whitefish School Board set up a citizens work group on safety and security last fall. Patty Johnson is a member.

Missoula high school students carry signs reading "No more thoughts & prayers" and "Fear has no place in school" during a walkout over gun safety, February 21, 2018.
Olga Kreimer

Missoula County Public Schools say they are ready for a student walkout that’s set to take place Wednesday, March 14. In a statement posted online and emailed to students and their families today, the district outlined how it plans to handle the walkout.

Whitefish Middle School.
Josh Burnham

The superintendent of schools in Whitefish has come out against arming teachers. Not everyone in the community agrees.

Superintendent Heather Davis Schmidt doesn’t mince words in her latest column in the Whitefish Pilot.

Young people who’ve experienced homelessness in Montana feel like they often fall through the cracks of programs designed to help kids fleeing abusive homes or needing a place to stay. Stock photo.
(PD)

During the last 12 months, almost 10 percent of Montana high school students attempted suicide one or more times. That’s according to a biannual youth risk behavior survey.

State lawmakers this year responded by requiring Montana’s 409 public school districts to draw up suicide prevention and response plans. A committee that met for the first time Wednesday will – as now mandated by law – develop a policy to ensure those districts follow through.

Elsie Arntzen is Montana's superintendent of public instruction.
Montana Legislature

Federal education officials have now weighed in on Montana’s plan to replace the No Child Left Behind law. Public educators here have been waiting on that since submitting the plan in September

More than 20 officials with Montana’s Office of Public Instruction gathered around a conference room table in Helena Wednesday to hear the federal Department of Education’s response to the state’s plan to comply with the Every Student Succeeds Act.

This month Montanans saw bigger property tax bills. That’s because this spring state lawmakers cut block grants to schools in order to save the state $29 million amid the ongoing budget crisis.

The elimination of the block grants to schools was spurred by the state’s more than $200 million budget crisis

PD

Montana’s plan to comply with the federal replacement for No Child Left Behind received Governor Steve Bullock’s approval Tuesday, but it’s still unclear if it will be accepted by the U.S. Department of Education.

Bullock, a Democrat, signed off on the state’s plan to comply with the Every Student Succeeds Act on Tuesday. It attempts to reduce the achievement gap between students and give states more say in local education.

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