MTPR

Donald Trump

A tweet from Montana’s Republican Sen. Steve Daines supporting President Trump’s racist tweets about four members of Congress has gone viral.
Twittter screen capture, July 16, 2019.

A tweet from Montana’s Republican Sen. Steve Daines supporting President Trump’s racist tweets about four members of Congress has gone viral.

Susan Crystal is a deputy assistant secretary for the State Department.
U.S. State Department

A U.S. State Department official is in Missoula this week. The University of Montana has a sports exchange program with Peru. MTPR's Kevin Trevellyan talked about diplomacy in the age of President Trump with Susan Crystal, deputy assistant secretary for the State Department.

KEVIN TREVELLYAN / MONTANA PUBLIC RADIO

Rich Trumka, the president of the country’s largest union federation, the AFL-CIO, was in Montana for the state’s convention in Missoula last week. The federation represents many workers in Montana’s troubled coal industry. 

Trumka is a third-generation miner. The Pennsylvania native can’t accept that workers, like those in Colstrip, are getting squeezed out of their jobs.

From left to right, Rep. Greg Gianforte, Sen. Al Olszewski and Attorney General Tim Fox.
Photo credit L- R, Eric Whitney, Corin Cates-Carney and Montana DOJ

Montana now has three Republicans campaigning for governor, with one candidate dropping out of the race to run for the U.S. House. Party leaders met in Helena this weekend. Veteran journalists Chuck Johnson and Ed Kemmick offer their analysis with Montana Free Press Editor John Adams.

Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET

President Trump says he might accept dirt from another country on his potential Democratic rivals if offered, raising new questions and concerns about foreign influence on American elections.

"It's not an interference, they have information — I think I'd take it," Trump said. "If I thought there was something wrong, I'd go maybe to the FBI — if I thought there was something wrong."

Updated at 2:13 p.m. ET

President Trump has conflated an infamous practice in and among political campaigns — "opposition research" — with foreign election interference like that launched by Russia against the United States in 2016.

Are they the same thing? Is foreign interference just a kind of "oppo research," as Trump said in an interview with ABC?

Montana could be caught in the spillover effects when China levies higher tariffs on U.S. products.

It’s another step in the ongoing trade war between China and the United States.

Last year, tariffs nearly knocked out Montana’s wheat exports to China.

The market has been less than stellar since, according to farmers in the state, which includes Lyle Benjamin, President of Montana Grain Growers Association.

Gov. Steve Bullock announces his candidacy for president in Helena, Mont., May 14, 2019.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

In the hours after Gov. Steve Bullock announced his candidacy for president in 2020 in an early morning video release on YouTube he met with local press outlets near downtown Helena in a half empty first floor office space — his new campaign headquarters.

"I’m excited about this next adventure," Bullock said. "I think that what we’ve done in Montana, both electorally and in getting government to work, is something that a lot of people can learn from.”

Gov. Steve Bullock.
Freddy Monares - UM Legislative News Service

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock is the latest candidate to join the crowded field of Democrats vying to unseat President Trump in 2020. Bullock waited until the Montana Legislature ended to announce his long-rumored candidacy. Now he'll find out if his statewide popularity will translate to a national stage. Bullock spoke with MTPR's Sally Mauk about his just-launched campaign and why he'd rather be president than a U.S. senator, and his positions on some key national issues.

Coal train
(PD)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. demand for coal to generate electricity will keep sliding in coming months, federal officials said Thursday, despite efforts by the Trump administration to shore up the struggling industry.

Renewable energy sources including wind, solar and hydropower are expected to fill much of the gap left by coal's decline, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Pages