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Donald Trump

House Republicans are pushing back against the impeachment investigation into President Trump, writing in a 123-page report that Democrats have not proven "evidence of bribery, extortion, or any high crime or misdemeanor."

The letter is a prebuttal to the Intelligence Committee's impeachment inquiry report, which is expected to be released Tuesday ahead of an evening committee meeting on its conclusions. A House Intelligence Committee official said this evening that report was now available for members to review.

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

As the House impeachment inquiry moves this week from the fact-gathering stage in the Intelligence Committee to considerations of law in the Judiciary Committee, the White House says President Trump does not intend to participate in a Wednesday hearing.

Updated at 9:33 a.m. ET Tuesday

A federal judge in Washington has ruled that former White House counsel Don McGahn must testify to House impeachment investigators, despite orders from the Trump administration that he not cooperate with Congress.

The decision by U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson clears the way for McGahn's testimony, sought by House Democrats in exploring Trump's possible obstruction of justice related to the Russia probe.

As the House appears to wrap up the investigative phase of its impeachment inquiry, a group of Senate Republicans met Thursday with White House officials, including counsel Pat Cipollone, to map out how a potential trial on articles of impeachment of President Trump could play out in the upper chamber.

During an extended phone interview with Fox & Friends on Friday morning, the president said he would like Rep. Adam Schiff, the chair of the House Intelligence Committee, to be called as a witness.

"Frankly, I want a trial," he said.

The marathon of testimony in Democrats' impeachment inquiry this week confirmed that the Ukraine affair, like so many earlier subplots in the era of President Trump, boils down to two big questions:

What do the president's words mean? Can the president do what he did?

The answers to those questions have been a partisan inkblot test since Trump exploded onto the political scene, and now they are burning again as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats decide how they'll move ahead in a showdown over impeachment.

NPR White House correspondent Franco Ordonez (@FrancoOrdonez) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the testimony of Fiona Hill Thursday morning.

Fiona Hill, formerly President Trump’s top Russia aide, and diplomat David Holmes testify on Thursday as part of the House’s impeachment inquiry.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young listens back to some highlights.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A U.S. appeals court opened the door for Congress to gain access to eight years of President Trump's tax records, setting the stage for a likely review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The full U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit declined to revisit an earlier ruling by a three-judge panel that allowed Congress to subpoena the president's tax records. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoenaed those records in March.

Watch Live: Trump Impeachment Inquiry Hearings

Nov 12, 2019
U.S. Capitol Illustration
Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

The U.S. House of Representatives is holding open hearings in its impeachment inquiry into President Trump. You can watch all the hearings here as they happen.

MTPR will also air the hearings live, along with a wrap-up special from NPR from 6-7 p.m. after each hearing. This special coverage will preempt our regular schedule.

Upcoming hearings are scheduled for Nov. 19, 20 & 21, starting at 7 a.m. Mountain Time.

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