MTPR

Denise Roth Barber

2019 Montana lobbying spending.
Cassidy Alexander, via Datawrapper / Montana Public Radio

At least $6.5 million dollars was spent on lobbying during the state’s 2019 legislative session. That’s according to the spending reports that groups trying to influence state lawmakers are legally required to file.

Montana Public Radio dug into the reports, which this year got harder for the public to make sense of.

Spending to influence Montana laws and elections.
National Institute on Money in Politics

At least $6.5 million was spent on lobbying efforts during Montana’s 2019 legislative session.

That’s more than two and a half times as much as legislative candidates have raised on their election campaigns annually in recent years.

Keith Regier (R) SD-3
Montana Legislature

A new bill in Montana's Senate would decrease the amount of information people who donate to political campaigns must reveal to the public.

The bill’s sponsor, Republican Keith Regier from Kalispell says he doesn’t think donors should have to share their employer or occupation when giving money to a political candidate or committee:

Montana Gubernatorial Race On Track To Break Funding Records

Jun 14, 2016

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Gov. Steve Bullock and Republican challenger Greg Gianforte brought in a total of more than $3.8 million in campaign contributions through last week's primary — already nearly as much as the $3.9 million Bullock and Republican Rick Hill collected during the entire 2012 gubernatorial campaign.

Montana will raise the minimum wage by $0.15 in January, 2018.
flickr user 401(k) 2012 (CC-BY-SA-2)

This year’s gubernatorial race is expected to draw record-breaking amounts of money for the two leading candidates. Recently, the opposing campaigns are disputing where that money is coming from.

Montana receives “F” for its disclosure laws

May 17, 2013
National Institute on Money in State Politics

A report released this week by the National Institute on Money in State Politics gives Montana a failing grade on its disclosure laws related to campaign spending in elections.

Twenty-five other states received “F”s in the report, while 15 states received an “A”.

“What we found interesting was that the state’s were either great or awful,” said the Institute’s Managing Director Denise Roth Barber. “There were very few in between.”