MTPR

David Brooks

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox cheered the Trump administration's rollback Thursday of an Obama-era clean water regulation.

The 2015 Waters of the United States rule was designed to protect many American wetlands and streams from pollution, but opponents argued it was too restrictive.

Ron Burns was among a half dozen people to speak in support of the Black Butte Copper Project during a public meeting in White Sulphur Springs April 30, 2019.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Around 60 people sat on the bleachers of the White Sulphur Springs high school gym Tuesday night, 15 miles south of where a proposed underground mine could remove more than 14 million of tons of copper-enriched rock from the earth.

The meeting was the last of three for public input on the state’s draft environmental impact statement on the controversial Black Butte Mining Project, located on private land near the Little Belt Mountains.

Hans McPherson at his ranch in the Bitterroot Valley.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

A new federal rule that would roll back Clean Water Act protections across the country opened for public comment last week. If finalized, the rule would abandon enhanced protections the Obama administration proposed for a large portion of Montana’s stream mileage and wetlands.

The University of Montana hosts David Brooks at the Wilma for UM’s President’s Lecture Series, September 10, 2018 at 7:30 p.m.
University of Montana

David Brooks has worn several journalistic hats over his career: reporter, editor, political and cultural commentator, and in recent years, best-selling author. Brooks presented this lecture, "The Cultural Revolution We Need,” on September 10th, 2018, at the Wilma Theater in Missoula, as part of the University of Montana’s President’s Lecture Series.

Screen capture from the "Stop I-186.com" website Oct. 16, 2018.
Stop I-186.com

Backers of a Montana citizen's initiative that would add new mining regulations say a foreign-owned company is illegally bankrolling an industry campaign against the proposal.

In a complaint Tuesday to the Federal Election Commission, sponsors of Initiative 186 alleged campaign law violations by the Montana Mining Association, Sandfire Resources and others.

Mistakes In Montana Voter Guide Cost $265,000

Oct 12, 2018
An image of part of the email from Montana's Secretary of State office announcing errors in the state Voter Information Pamphlet
Montana Secretary of State's office

The official Montana voter information pamphlet many voters have received contains formatting errors. An addendum correcting them has now been mailed out at a total cost of more than $265,000.

In an email yesterday, Montana Secretary of State Corey Stapleton announced that the one page addendum was being mailed.

Nick Mott

The latest fundraising reports say opponents of a ballot initiative aimed at protecting Montana waterways from mine pollution have raised about 25 percent more money than its supporters, despite not taking in any cash in August.

The University of Montana hosts David Brooks at the Wilma for UM’s President’s Lecture Series, September 10, 2018 at 7:30 p.m.
University of Montana

New York Times columnist, author and public broadcasting commentator David Brooks is in Missoula to kick off the University of Montana's President's Lecture series. The conservative pundit spoke about Donald Trump and humility with Sally Mauk before the lecture.

"To me, humility is not thinking lowly of yourself," Brooks says. "My favorite definition is, 'it's radical self-awareness from a position of other-centeredness."

Montana Capitol, Helena, MT.
William Marcus / Montana Public Radio

State lawmakers will formally vote on a proposal for the Legislature to come back to Helena for a July 16 special session.

Secretary of State Corey Stapleton tweeted just before five Wednesday afternoon that his office will send out ballots to legislators as soon as possible.

The effort to convene a special session comes at the request of Republicans concerned about a pair of citizens initiatives that will likely appear on ballots this November.

The Environmental Protection Agency designated the former Columbia Falls Aluminum Company as an official Superfund site in September 2016.
Courtesy Columbia Falls Aluminum Company

Environmental groups say President Donald Trump’s proposed budget for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency budget could mean less grant money for pollution control, drinking water protection and Superfund clean up in Montana.

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