MTPR

Dave Chadwick

A coalition of wildlife, conservation and outdoor recreation business groups in Montana has announced it’s launching a survey to determine support and strategies to fund conservation and access projects.

Land and Water Conservation Fund.
LWCF.org

Montana’s U.S. senators expect a bill that would permanently re-establish the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) to move forward this week. The LWCF expired in September due to congressional inaction.

The Clark Fork River near the University of Montana Campus, April 30, 2018.
Josh Burnham / MTPR

The Trump Administration’s plan to roll back an Obama-era policy designed to protect over half the nation’s waterways from pollution is drawing starkly different reactions in Montana.

The Montana Wildlife Federation’s Dave Chadwick condemns the re-write of the so-called “Waters of the United States” policy as a sweeping mistake.

At a ranch house in rural Montana, Rick White peels the bun off Arby's new venison sandwich.

"It looks like deer," he says. "Venison."

His dog, Finn, stares at the sandwich and whines.

"It's a gray meat," he says. "It doesn't look like a ground patty. It looks more like McDonald's style, but thicker."

Like a lot of people in Montana, White is a lifelong deer hunter. And he's just the kind of person Arby's wants eating their new venison and elk steak sandwiches.

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument in central Montana
BLM (PD)

A new survey suggests broad support for central Montana’s Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument.

The poll comes after an April executive order from President Trump ordering a review of some two dozen national monuments designated since 1996.

Montana Capitol
Eric Whitney

The start of the 2015 Legislative session is still seven weeks away, but a group of Democratic lawmakers, scientists, and activists is already working to frame a possible legislative debate on climate change. 

Among those who spoke at a climate change-focused news conference on Thursday was Dave Chadwick, Executive Director of the Montana Wildlife Federation. He says even without the EPA pressuring the state to cut its carbon emissions by 20 percent in 15 years, slowing or reversing climate change would still be a priority, to save the state’s hunting and fishing industry.

All Of Montana’s Waters Need Protection

Aug 7, 2014

Montana’s rivers, streams, lakes, and wetlands are an unmatched natural resource.  Our clean, cool waters support an abundance of fish and wildlife, they provide us with clean drinking water, and they give us a place to escape the heat on these August afternoons.