MTPR

Dan Wenk

Yellowstone National Park is taking action against up to a dozen employees after an investigation found some female workers were subjected to sexual harassment and other problems.

Superintendent Dan Wenk says some of the employees could be fired while others could receive suspensions or counseling.

“Tell me an organization that’s almost 1,000 employees and find me one that doesn’t have issues about work place issues, find me one,” said Wenk. “I don’t think you will. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t improve it.”

Leaders of the state and federal agencies involved in managing grizzly bears are meeting in Missoula Tuesday and Wednesday.
(PD)

Leaders of the state and federal agencies involved in managing grizzly bears are meeting in Missoula Tuesday and Wednesday.

Members of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) convene twice a year to coordinate policy, planning, management and research in the states where grizzlies live. Their goal is to recover local populations so that eventually the bears can be moved off of the endangered species list.

Officials Move Closer To Delisting Yellowstone Grizzlies

Nov 17, 2016
Grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park. (File photo).
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Wildlife officials have moved one step closer to removing the Yellowstone grizzly population from the Endangered Species Act by approving a future conservation strategy.

Montana Lawmakers Push For Tribal Bison Hunts In Yellowstone

Sep 15, 2016
The Service is drafting comprehensive conservation plans, or CCPs, and accompanying environmental analyses for two areas: one for the National Bison Range, and a separate CCP for the rest of the units within the refuge complex.
Mike Albans

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A Montana legislative committee that wants to limit Yellowstone National Park's growing herds of bison from leaving the park sent a recommendation Thursday to park officials for American Indian tribes to be allowed to hunt bison inside the park.

Visitor Misbehavior Abounds As National Park Service Turns 100

Aug 29, 2016
In the spring of 2016 a Canadian tourist in Yellowtone put a bison calf in his SUV hoping to save it. Less spectacular but equally dangerous and rule-breaking behavior at the parks is on the rise, according to law enforcement officials.
Courtesy

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Tourist John Gleason crept through the grass, four small children close behind, inching toward a bull elk with antlers like small trees at the edge of a meadow in Yellowstone National Park.

"They're going to give me a heart attack," said Gleason's mother-in-law, Barbara Henry, as the group came within about a dozen yards of the massive animal.

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