Montana Public Radio

COVID-19

A woman receives the COVID-19 vaccine at the Bozeman fairgrounds, January 6, 2011.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

As new COVID-19 cases begin to rise again in the state, Montana’s large counties say the COVID vaccine will not be available to those in Phase 1B for at least the next few weeks due to uncertain vaccine supply.

Gallatin City-County Health Officer Matt Kelley said the county is adapting its vaccine plan to match Governor Greg Gianforte’s revisions in a press conference Friday.

A PCR testing station at Montana State University
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Spring semester begins this week for students in the Montana University System. Asymptomatic students living in campus residential halls will be able to be tested for COVID-19.

COVID-19 testing for students without symptoms will take place over the two weeks of the start of the spring semester for those campuses with substantial residence hall populations.

At a House Judiciary Committee meeting at the Montana Capitol January 5, 2021 lawmakers wearing masks and those with bare faces sat next to each other. Some committee chairs are requiring participants to adhere to public health guidance, others aren't.
Shaylee Ragar / Montana Public Radio

A panel of Montana state legislative leaders adopted new guidelines Friday for holding the session during the coronavirus pandemic. The move came one day after a state lawmaker announced he tested positive for COVID-19.

A Coup Attempt, A Budget Proposal And COVID Confusion

Jan 9, 2021
'Capitol Talk' is MTPR's weekly legislative analysis program.
Montana Public Radio

Montana lawmakers had very different takes on Wednesday's insurrection and the unfounded claims that fueled it. Gov. Gianforte released his budget proposal. And the Legislature started out with confusing and contradictory COVID-19 protocols.

Listen now on Capitol Talk, with MTPR's Sally Mauk, Lee Newspapers State Bureau Chief Holly Michels and UM Political Science Professor Rob Saldin.

Brian Nickolay gets vaccinated for COVID-19 at the Gallatin County Fairgrounds, January 6, 2021.
Nick Mott / Montana Public Radio

Healthcare workers in Montana are getting vaccinated for COVID-19. Montana Public Radio’s Nick Mott has more on what the vaccination process will look like as the rollout ramps up.

Selling more liquor licenses would raise between $2.5 million and $4 millin for the state.
(PD)

The omnibus spending bill passed by Congress last week and signed into law by President Donald Trump on Sunday makes tax cuts permanent for manufacturers of beer, wine and spirits. The cuts will likely help keep Montana brewers in business as they weather the rest of the pandemic.

At a House Judiciary Committee meeting at the Montana Capitol January 5, 2021 lawmakers wearing masks and those with bare faces sat next to each other. Some committee chairs are requiring participants to adhere to public health guidance, others aren't.
Shaylee Ragar / Montana Public Radio

As the 67th Montana Legislature gets underway, lawmakers are establishing the various ways they’ll conduct business amid the public health threat of the coronavirus. The COVID-19 protocols in each committee room may look different.

Gov. Greg Gianforte releases his plans for the state’s response to COVID-19 at a press conference January 5, 2021. He said he will rescind the statewide mask mandate, but only after certain criteria are met.
James Bradley / UM Legislative News Service

On his second day in office, Gov. Greg Gianforte pledged to lift Montana’s statewide mask mandate enacted by his predecessor to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Now local areas are preparing face-covering ordinances of their own.

At a press conference Tuesday, Gianforte said addressing COVID-19 was his top priority as governor, and that he would be issuing new guidance to help the state recover.

A protestor's sign sits outside the House of Representatives gallery during the swearing-in ceremony in the Capitol, January 4, 2021.
Austin Amestoy / UM Legislative News Servic

Montana’s 67th Legislature convened Monday in the Capitol building in Helena where lawmakers remain split on how best to meet amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

A gloved hand swabs a person's arm, prepping it for a shot.
iStock

Jess Sheldahl: For YPR News, I'm Jess Sheldahl. Details about who will next receive the covid-19 vaccine in Montana and when are emerging, nearly 17,000 health care personnel in the state have received the first dose of the vaccine so far. Here to share what we know and still don't know about the rollout are Montana Public Radio's Aaron Bolton and Yellowstone Public Radio News’ is Nicky Ouellet Nicky Ouellet.

 

  

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