MTPR

Collette Adkins

In a rugged canyon in southern Wyoming, a helicopter drops nets over a pair of coyotes. They're bound, blindfolded and flown to a landing station. There, University of Wyoming researchers place them on a mat. The animals stay calm and still while technicians figure out their weight, age, sex and other measurements. Graduate student Katey Huggler fits the coyotes with tracking collars.

The M-44 consists of a capsule holder, a cyanide capsule, a spring-activated ejector, and a stake. When triggered they propel one gram of lethal sodium cyanide into an animal's mouth.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

Predator-killing cyanide traps will no longer be used on public lands in Colorado, pending further study. Colorado is now the second state to take a closer look at use of the devices, also known as M-44 cyanide bombs.

These are spring-loaded devices that resemble sprinklers. When triggered they propel one gram of lethal sodium cyanide into an animal's mouth.