MTPR

Chris Downs

Westslope cutthroat trout.
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

For the first time, Glacier National Park is attempting to eradicate non-native trout species and restore native westslope cutthroat trout. The project on the west side of the park specifically aims to preserve genetically pure westslope populations.

Hybridization between westslope cutthroat trout and non-native rainbow trout in Glacier National Park. Green = westslope cutthroat genes. Red = rainbow trout genes.
National Parks Service

Glacier National Park released an environmental assessment Friday for a proposal to kill off non-native fish in a remote area. Biologists say that could help fortify native species against the threats of climate change, invasive species and habitat loss.

View Of The North Fork of The Flathead River Near Ford Cabin.
Flathead National Forest

During a planning meeting in Columbia Falls Wednesday, people who live near the Flathead River said they’re concerned about climate change, user impacts and nearby railroad activity,

Two federal agencies are tasked with updating management of the Flathead’s three forks under the Wild and Scenic River Act: The U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service. They say that despite the river’s unusually high water quality, threats remain.

Glacier National Park recently reopened Lake McDonald to some motorboat users, following a months-long quarantine to keep invasive mussels out of the lake.
Nicky Ouellet

This summer one tiny-shelled invertebrate has dominated the conversation about keeping non-native species out of Montana.

Since zebra and quagga mussel larvae were detected in Tiber Reservoir last summer, local, state, tribal and federal agencies have scrambled to enact programs and policies to keep the mussels out of Montana’s waterways.