Montana Public Radio

bonds

Legislative Auditor Angus Maciver answers lawmakers questions Jan. 13, 2020. The Legislative Audit Division and the Governor's Office are in an ongoing dispute over an unpublished report looking at Montana's  health department and Medicaid system.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Montana’s Legislative Auditor is pushing back against the Governor’s Office’s public criticism of an unpublished report on the state health department. The administration says the details are holding up $80 million in infrastructure projects.

Lawmakers were briefed on the brewing controversy during the kickoff of Legislative Week.

Montana State Capitol.
Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Gov. Steve Bullock’s administration says an $80 million infrastructure package is facing an “unacceptable” delay after passage during last year’s legislative session. The bipartisan spending deal on public works is hung up after an audit questioning state finances and Medicaid spending.

Three Montana cities have passed school bonds for construction, including a $125 million bond in Bozeman to build a new high school and remodel the current one.

Lawmakers Sit Down With Governor To Talk Bonding

Apr 25, 2017

Lawmakers wrapped up Day 85 of their scheduled 90-day Legislative session with no agreement reached on a bonding package.

That morning, 11 legislators sat down with Governor Steve Bullock, Budget Director Dan Villa and other staff in the Governor's Conference Room to talk about possibilities. Specifically, what would it take to reach the 67 votes needed in the House to pass a bonding bill.

Among the bills put on the table were those dealing with abortion and charter schools. House Minority Leader Jenny Eck, D-Helena, said if those bills were part of the deal, the Republican majority would lose Democratic votes, which could doom bonding.


New Republican Infrastructure Proposal Hits A Speed Bump

Mar 22, 2017

House Democrats say they won’t support a new House Republican infrastructure proposal that would issue bonds to pay for rural water, wastewater, some road and school projects.

When it comes to infrastructure at the Montana Legislature even a simple matter over whether there were negotiations on the topic is up for dispute.


Bonding Bill Opens at Montana Legislature

Jan 13, 2017

In principal, the main bill that funds road, water, and other infrastructure projects continues to have broad support.

“We do fully support the notion of increased funding at that local level for critical infrastructure, like roads, bridges, water and sewer and the use of bonding in supporting that infrastructure,” said Darryl James of the Montana Infrastructure Coalition.


Bond supporters say the existing 42-year-old library is now too small, technologically outdated and energy inefficient. Critics say Missoulians are now constantly barraged with bond issues and it’s starting to add up.
Josh Burnham

Missoula voters will be asked to approve a $30 million public library bond this November. County commissioners today unanimously approved the ballot language.

Voting booths at the Missoula Library.
Josh Burnham

Lewis and Clark County Commissioner Susan Good Geise says voters on Tuesday not only said "no" to plans for a new detention center, they said “heck no”.

Missoula County Public Schools Superintendent Mark Thane says he’s “extremely grateful” for Tuesday’s 11th-hour victory of a $70 million high school bond issue. Local voters passed it as well as an $88 million dollar elementary bond. The levies will pay for local school maintenance, renovations, remodeling and technology and security updates.

Fewer state and federal dollars are filling Montana school district coffers, so school officials are turning to local voters for help.

Bob Vogel of the Montana School Boards Association says bonding requests are becoming more common.

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