MTPR

Bitterroot Valley

The Howe Ridge Fire in Glacier National Park on August 21, 2018
Inciweb

A new Montana Free Press series is shedding a light on how policies of the past and present intersect with wildfire response. Amanda Eggert, a former wildland firefighter and freelance journalist, is writing the three-part series Living With Fire. Montana Public Radio’s Aaron Bolton spoke with her about the series.

A firefighter stands in front of flames from a wildfire.
(PD)

Scientists at the University of Montana have found that climate change is already reducing the ability of some forests in the western U.S. to bounce back after wildfire. Their findings are confirming a long-suspected change.

For the past three years, UM post-doc Kimberly Davis has looked at how ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests regenerate after fire, and she’s made an eye-opening discovery.

Dangerously Cold Temperatures Forecast For Western Montana
National Weather Service Missoula

Missoula National Weather Service Meteorologist Corby Dickerson sums up Montana’s winter of 2018/2019 this way.

"We started off the winter a little slow, then we accelerated. And then this month of February, historic in many ways, has been like we just slammed on the gas pedal and said, 'What spring? What mid-winter thaw?'.

House for sale.
(PD)

Today we’re taking a look at housing prices in Montana. In our last story, we reported on how tariffs on Canadian and Chinese building supplies are driving up prices for new homes in Montana.

But there appears to be some downward pressure on prices for existing homes.

“Well, so things are starting to change,” says Brint Wahlberg, of the Missoula Organization of Realtors.

Wahlberg says the local median sales price is still holding strong at close to $290,000.

Controlled burn in the Bitterroot National Forest.
Bitterroot National Forest

Federal land managers are planning controlled burns in the Bitterroot and Blackfoot Valleys.

The Bitterroot National Forest is planning to start prescribed burning projects as early as this week, depending on weather. Fire managers plan to burn 2,200 acres this fall.

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