MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

From Donald Trump to the Virgin Mary, Darth Vader to the Dalai Lama, Schlegel turns cultural criticism personal with bracing intelligence and vulnerability as she explores what it means to be human, a woman, an artist, and, in particular, a parent: what it means to love a child beyond measure, someone so vulnerable, familiar, and strange. 

Bug Bytes: Fiddler Crabs - The Kings Of Animal Weaponry

Jun 24, 2019
Fiddler crab, Uca leptodactyla in Margarita Island, Venezuela.
(PD)

When you think of an animal with an impressive weapon, the first images that pop to mind might be a bull elk or moose with their massive antlers. Or maybe a bull elephant with its enormous tusks.

But the king of weaponry in the animal kingdom might surprise you: a fiddler crab that’s less than 2 inches long.

Cottonwoods: Born From The Floods

Jun 24, 2019
Cottonwoods line a flood plain on Rock Creek near Missoula.
Josh Burnham

I’ve just started noticing cottonwood seeds in the air again — the bits of white fluff that bounce around on the breeze. It seems impossible that big, beautiful cottonwood trees can grow from such insubstantial beginnings.

Flickr user, Justin Henry. CC-BY-2.0

The Food Guys, Jon Jackson and Greg Patent, discuss an article published in the March edition of the journal Science about a study linking the consumption of high fructose corn syrup with colorectal cancer. According to the study, drinking a modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup -- the equivalent of about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily -- accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mice, independently of obesity.

With calm abandon, Rob Schlegel stands among the genderless trees to shake notions of masculinity and fatherhood. Schlegel incorporates the visionary into everyday life, inhabiting patterns of relation that do not rely on easy categories. Working from the premise that poetry is indistinguishable from the life of the poet, Schlegel considers how his relationship to the creative process is forever changed when he becomes something new to someone else. "The meaning I'm trying to protect is," Schlegel writes, "the heart is neither boy, nor girl." In the Tree Where the Double Sex Sleeps is a tender search for the mother in the father, the poet in the parent, the forest in the human.

Bug Bytes: Insect Farts

Jun 17, 2019
Beaded lacewing
Lucinda Gibson, Museum Victoria [CC BY 3.0 au (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/deed.en)]

We’ve all done it. Most of us have joked about it. Even animals do it. Pooting. Tooting. Who ever denied it, supplied it. We all pass gas.

But did you know that insects fart too? And in the case of the beaded lacewing, they lend a whole new meaning to “silent, but deadly.”

'The Food Guys' Praise Their Favorite Kitchen Gadgets

Jun 16, 2019
Rosenfeld Media CC-BY-2.0

The Food Guys, Greg and Jon, praise their favorite kitchen gadgets. 

"Sometimes the job we have to do is often uncomfortable, whether it’s killing a deer to put it out of its pain, or to open it up. It’s kind of that pen too, to open up stories, to open up wounds that need to be reopened to be able to heal properly. I think the knife serves that metaphorical purpose as well." -- CMarie Fuhrman

Honeybee Losses, Colony Collapse, And The Four 'P's

Jun 10, 2019
Muhammad Mahdi Karim

The Food Guys, Jon Jackson and Greg Patent, discuss the recent large-scale disappearance of European honey bees, both wild and managed.  Although the phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder probably peaked in 2007, twelve years later, honeybee losses remain high, thanks to the “four p’s” — poor nutrition, pesticides, pathogens and parasites.

Bug Bytes: Earwigs - Creepy But Caring

Jun 10, 2019
Earwig
David Short [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]

For some people it’s spiders. For others it’s centipedes. But for many people, the answer to “What kind of bug really creeps you out” is earwigs.

Maybe it’s the big pincers at the end of their abdomen? Maybe it’s the fact that it's a bug with the word “ear” in its name. Whatever the case, they’re not high on many people’s lists of lovable insects.

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