MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

"I think fear is for people who don't get out very much. The flipside of fear is understanding. We gain understanding when we travel ... Get out, celebrate the diversity, be inspired," says Rick Steves, host of Travel with Rick Steves.

The program joined MTPR's new radio schedule at the beginning of the month. Steves speaks with MTPR's Michael Marsolek about how travel can help you get out of your comfort zone, grow and better understand the world.

Mildred Groves is an unusual young woman. Gifted and cursed with the ability to see the future, Mildred runs away from home to take a secretary position at the Hanford Research Center in the early 1940s. Hanford, a massive construction camp on the banks of the Columbia River in remote South Central Washington, exists to test and manufacture a mysterious product that will aid the war effort. Only the top generals and scientists know that this product is processed plutonium, for use in the first atomic bombs.

Freshwater diatom seen under a scanning electron microscope.
Courtesy UM Electron Microscopy Facility

The bottom of this shallow stream is covered with a complex community of algae, comprising many different species. Probably most abundant of all are the diatoms, many of which secrete a slippery mucus as they travel, leaving the rocks very slick.

Glorious Green Pesto Is Simple To Make

Sep 1, 2019
Elise Roedenbeck (CC-BY-NC-2.0)

Pesto is a gooey, thick, grey-green Genoese sauce composed of basil, olive oil, garlic, pine nuts and cheese whose name comes from pestâ, the Genoese word for "pounded." Its strong flavor can pleasantly mask (or crush) the mild flavors of accompanyments like pasta, chicken, salmon and poached eggs. Pesto is easy to make in a food processor, even though Genoans recommend using a mortar and pestle. It's well-suited for summer, when fresh basil is almost as ubiquitous as zucchini.

Chris La Tray

"This is a sunrise book, a book of revelations, of creekwalks and roadfood and ordinary sadnesses, ordinary joys—which are, in the end, the only kind. ‘I have a stake in this,’ La Tray writes. And so do you. So do you.” — Joe Wilkins 

Courtesy of Winona LaDuke

"This is my idea of when America was great: when there were 8,000 varieties of corn ... when there were 50 million buffalo, the single largest migratory herd in the world ... in a territory with 250 different species of grass. Tremendous biodiversity: that is where life is, in biodiversity. Today, in the same landscape, you and I know that does not exist."

In February 2019, environmental justice activist, economist and writer Winona LaDuke delivered the annual Brennan Guth Memorial Lecture in Environmental Philosophy, as part of the University of Montana President’s Lecture Series at Missoula's Wilma Theater.

Do Noxious Weeds Owe Their Success To Soil Microbes?

Aug 25, 2019
Ivar Leidus

"What exactly is a weed? This can be a tricky question to answer. A plant that is nurtured and cultivated by one gardener may be yanked out unapologetically by the next, in favor of something preferable. It seems that a weed to one person can be a prized plant to another.

Rita E

Ah, the apricot. This overlooked fruit, long claimed by China, India and Armenia, probably made its way to Europeans via the Silk Road. Aromatic, pulpy and not too sweet - apricots have 7 g. of sugar and 2 g. of fiber per 100 g. of fruit -  it's great fresh or dried and makes wonderful jams, tarts, cakes, wine, leather - and chutney.

“Eager" is the powerful story of how nature’s most ingenious architects shaped our world, and how they can help save it—if we let them. Ben Goldfarb’s captivating book reveals how beavers transformed our landscapes, and how modern-day “Beaver Believers”—including scientists, ranchers, and passionate citizens—are recruiting these ecosystem engineers to help us fight our most pressing environmental problems. The Washington Post calls it, “A masterpiece of a treatise on the natural world” and The Boston Globe calls it, “The best sort of environmental journalism.”

Summer Apples: To Bake, Or Not To Bake?

Aug 19, 2019
PD

"I didn't even KNOW some apples ripen in July." So asserts Food Guy Jon Jackson -  in spite of the quarts of applesauce he cooks each year from White Transparents, one of Montana's summer apples. When it comes to early apples, Other Food Guy Greg Patent, a.k.a. The Baking Wizard, needs to know: can you BAKE with them?

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