MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

“He was like a pebble, a pearl that lived under my tongue in that place no one would ever touch with fingers, where my laughter washed over his curved back. I considered his various pasts: sea- or river-worn, tumbled and tragically washed for God knows how long. He was a bulb of promise, nacreous and luminary, where he sensed my words before they crossed my lips, where he navigated the shadowy channels I couldn’t possibly see. He lived sometimes inside my cheek and he knew what was at stake: if he happened by some mishandling to land between my teeth, one of us would crack. We both agreed on symbiosis and made a promise against fracture.” -- Amy Ratto Parks

Burnt snags in western Montana
Josh Burnham (CC-BY-NC-2)

One of my favorite places to look in the forest is up. I love the way trees frame patches of sky, and how rays of sun slide over the branches and slant into pockets of darkness. On a recent stroll through the woods near Echo lake, I found myself, as usual, looking up. I saw mostly fir and birch trees, and I took their narrow trunks and modest heights as signs of a young forest. But it was a much older tree that caught my eye.

Martin Luther King Jr.
(PD)

Celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with highlights from the annual Love Lives Here in the Flathead Valley celebration, recorded Friday in Whitefish.

Tune in on your radio or online Monday night at 8.

Pear Tart-Off: Tatin Vs. Galette

Jan 20, 2019
Alpha (CC-BY-2.0)

"Food Guy" Jon Jackson loves a good French pear tart. "I once went to Paris once specifically to get some pear tarts, and you know, the people there were anxious for me to have them." Jon asks Other "Food Guy" Greg Patent: is it worth trying to substitute pears for apples in tarte tatin, the Hotel Tatin's signature caramelized upside-down apple tart recipe?

Patagonia

"I, for one, choose a world in which I am not always at the top of the food chain. It's good, sometimes, to near a summit only to be turned back by a world that is bigger than your ambition." -- Jim Williams

'Field Notes' Investigates Gizzard Grit

Jan 14, 2019
Ruffed Grouse
Flickr user tuchodi (CC-BY-2)

Afternoon sunshine was softening into twilight on a recent fall day as I drove with my family down a forest road in the mountains north of Missoula. We were heading home after a day of hiking and grouse hunting—and we had a blue grouse to roast for dinner. We rounded a bend to find a covey of seven ruffed grouse, milling about in the road and pecking at the gravelly surface. What were they doing?

Flickr user, JeffreyW (CC-BY-20)

When "Food Guy" Greg Patent, who had been sitting on a bottle of Ligurian extra virgin olive oil - made with black Taggiasca olives and wrapped up to protect it from the ravages of daylight - discovered food writer Samim Nosrat's Netflix series, "Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat," serendipity struck in the form of Nosrat's recipe for Ligurian focaccia.

Can Do: The Fickle Business Of Sushi

Jan 11, 2019
Drake Doepke.
Drake Doepke.

In 2009 Drake Doepke was living in Kauai as a self-described “beach bum” when he decided to move back to Montana and open a sushi restaurant. Nine years later and without any prior business experience, Doepke owns three successful Asian restaurants in Montana.

Learn from Doepke about the "trails by fire" of starting a business from scratch, on this episode of "Can Do: Lessons From Savvy Entrepreneurs" with Arnie Sherman.

A Family History of Illness is a gritty historical memoir that examines the body's immune system and microbial composition as well as the biological and cultural origins of memory and history, offering a startling, fresh way to view the role of history in understanding our physical selves. In his own search, Walker soon realizes that this broader scope is more valuable than a strictly medical family history. He finds that family legacies shape us both physically and symbolically, forming the root of our identity and values, and he urges us to renew our interest in the past or risk misunderstanding ourselves and the world around us.

In a little-known North American rainforest lives a reclusive animal more commonly associated with the Arctic. The mountain caribou exists on the edge of extinction—a dire situation that offers us the gift of understanding how we, as humans, affect even the most remote places on the planet and that our personal, political, and environmental choices matter. 

Pages