Montana Public Radio

Rachel Cramer

Reporter

Rachel Cramer is a reporter for Yellowstone Public Radio

Several days after Yellowstone National Park reopened its two Wyoming entrances to visitors, the park lifted the gates at its north and northeastern Montana entrances for through-traffic only. It may provide relief for some business owners during Memorial Day weekend.

 

The Montana Secretary of State oversees elections and election laws, maintains records on legislation and business filings, and serves on the state Board of Land Commissioners, among other duties. Seven candidates are vying for the position in the primary election.


A federal agency agreed to temporarily limit how and where it kills wildlife that threaten livestock in Montana. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reached the settlement in federal court with WildEarth Guardians May 14.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks on May 19 announced the first suspected case of chronic wasting disease in a new area in the southwest corner of the state.

 


Montanans may submit public comment on a proposal to expand the Designated Surveillance Area for brucellosis in the southwest part of the state. If approved, the DSA would expand to include the area between Dillon, Twin Bridges and Alder.

 

Sagebrush grasslands in southwest Montana have been disappearing for decades, putting ranchers and wildlife in jeopardy. A project is aiming to reverse this trend and engage a local workforce left in limbo by the novel coronavirus.

Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks announced plans to partially reopen in phases starting on May 18, after a seven week closure due to COVID-19. 

Starting Monday at noon, visitors will be allowed to enter Yellowstone National Park through its southern and eastern Wyoming gates. They’ll be limited to the lower loop of the park, which includes Old Faithful, Yellowstone Lake and Hayden Valley.

A Montana State University team will start testing Big Sky’s wastewater this week to help track whether the novel coronavirus is trending up or down in the resort town.


Child care is a critical part of Montana’s economic recovery from COVID-19 as more parents return to work. But some providers have closed permanently and others are struggling, adding to an already dire shortage. Recently released federal funding may only provide short term relief as the state faces a child care crisis.

As Yellowstone National Park moves closer to releasing its reopening plan, the community next to its busiest entrance is working on boosting its ability to test residents, workers and visitors for the COVID-19 illness. 

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