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2018 Montana Republican Senate Primary Voting Guide

May 9, 2018

Four Montana Republicans are running in the June 5 primary election for a chance to unseat Montana’s Senior U.S. Senator, Democrat Jon Tester, in the Nov. 6 general election. The Montana Free Press surveyed the four candidates to see where they stand on 10 key issues. The candidates were asked to respond in 50 words or less to each question. Below are their responses, edited only for length and style.

Moderator Mark Holston pitches a question to Democratic Congressional hopeful Kathleen Williams as, L to R, John Heenan, Grant Kier, John Meyer and Jared Pettinato look on in Columbia Falls on April 28
Nicky Ouellet

With just more than a month before the June 5 primary, the five Democrats vying for their party’s nomination to take on Republican incumbent Congressman Greg Gianforte are still gently teasing out what sets them apart from the rest of the field.

The candidates generally repeated their main stumping points at a two-hour forum on Saturday at Columbia Falls High School, organized by the Flathead County Democrats.

Army veterans Andrew Person and Cliff Larsen give a press conference outside Senator Jon Tester's Missoula office Thursday, April 26, 2018.
Eric Whitney

President Donald Trump called out Montana Senator Jon Tester today on national television in the wake of the President’s pick for VA Secretary withdrawing his nomination.

On Wednesday Tester, a Democrat running for a third term in November, released a two-page list of allegations against Admiral Ronny Jackson. Tester said they came from 23 active duty military personnel and veterans who served with Jackson, none of whom were identified, because, Tester said, they feared retribution.

Kristin Page-Nei, one of the authors of I-185, speaks in support of the initiative in Helena, April 19, 2018. The ballot initiative proposes increasing tobacco taxes to raise money for health care programs, including Medicaid expansion.
Corin-Cates Carney

Montana’s Medicaid expansion program, which provides more than 93,000 people in the state health coverage, expires in just over a year. Campaigns are now underway to stop that from happening and to lobby support for the health care program.

Morphine pills.
Eric Norris (CC-BY-2)

The Trump administration this week released almost $500 million to combat the nation’s opioid crisis. 

Montana’s share of that federal funding from Health and Human Services is $2 million, the same amount it received last year.

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