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Healthcare news from Montana Public Radio.

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A group in the Flathead Valley is trying to bring more training and awareness about postpartum depression to the area by hosting a comedy show and fundraiser this weekend.

Having a baby was supposed to be the happiest time of Emily Lucas’s life. At least, that’s what movies, books and pop-culture implied.

Montanans on both sides of the abortion issued weighed-in Friday on the Trump administration’s plan to bar taxpayer-funded family planning clinics from referring women for abortions.

The Trump plan echoes a Reagan-era rule to ban abortion referrals by federally funded clinics. Details are sparse thus far, but it would also bar those same clinics from sharing space with abortion providers.

Paintings on display at the 'Stomp The Stigma' art show at the Western Montana Mental Health Center.
Nicky Ouellet

For Fred Waters, painting isn’t so much about crafting a perfect piece of art for others to see. Instead, painting gives him a chance to quiet the constant racket in his head and focus on one detail at a time.

"For a few of us, the painting is a way to express feelings or allow ourself to have certain feelings. Because like for me, life gets overwhelmingly scary and there’s a lot of stuff I want to numb out and don't deal with anymore," he says.

Tom Laughlin of Anaconda, MT says he has an autoimmune disease and he's concerned about the health impacts of the old copper smelter in town.  He met with officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during a public health listening sessi
Corin Cates-Carney

More than 35 years after the Anaconda copper smelter closed, federal health officials are partnering with state and local governments to visit the town and to listen to people’s health concerns possibly related to the toxic waste left behind.

From 1:30 to 7:30 Thursday afternoon at the Anaconda senior center, locals could stop by and talk to government scientists and doctors about their worries.

Office of the governor, budget and program planning.
William Marcus

Budgets within Montana’s state health department and office of public defender are busted.

Lawmakers in the Legislative Finance Committee Wednesday debated a proposal from Governor Steve Bullock to borrow more than $23 million from next year’s budget to pay for the state’s current financial troubles.

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