MTPR

climate change

These scientists are using GPS units to record precise locations of the edges of Grinnell Glacier.
USGS

Newly released data say glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park have shrunk as much as 85 percent since the 1960s, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Some are now so small they’ve lost the characteristics that make them glaciers.

Greg Gianforte, Rob Quist and Mark Wicks at the MTN News debate April 29, 2017.
Screen capture courtesy MTN News

Mark Wicks, the Libertarian candidate for Montana’s U.S. House seat, got statewide exposure in the race’s only televised debate Friday, produced and broadcast by MTN News.

"We’ve been doing the same thing over and over and over, and we get the same result: People back in Washington that aren’t doing what they’re supposed to because they’re beholden to special interests, they’re taking lobbyist money. I’m not beholden to any of that." Wicks said during the debate.

Power plant at Colstrip, MT.
Beth Saboe, MontanaPBS

As state lawmakers debate bills designed to keep the strip mine and coal fired power plant at Colstrip open as long as possible, a social experimenter in Helena is convening an event aimed at the heart of the debate over whether fossil fuel-based economies should have a place in Montana’s Future. Tate Chamberlin has pulled together activists, politicians, and entrepreneurs to dive deep into thorny questions around coal, jobs, and climate change. I asked him what he has in mind.

Rob Quist.
Josh Burnham

Democratic U.S. House candidate Rob Quist is traveling around Montana holding rallies where he emphasizes  his stand on protecting public lands. He's also been in the news for unpaid debts and tax liens on his property.

MTPR's Sally Mauk talks with the nominee about his positions on everything from gun rights to healthcare and what he thinks of President Trump.

Montana Tea Travelers Bring Home The Kenyan Purple

Feb 27, 2017
Purple tea at Lake Missoula Tea Company in Missoula, MT.
Rachel Cramer

In the world of tea, a new variety is on the cusp of becoming the next big craze. It’s praised for its health benefits — high levels of cancer-fighting antioxidants exceeding even those found from drinking green tea — and its resistance to climate change in Kenya where it was developed. It came onto the market about five years ago, and at the moment, Lake Missoula Tea Company in Missoula, Montana, is one of the only distributors in North America. It's called purple tea, and it might just save Kenya's struggling tea industry.

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