MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Snowshoe hare.
Nate Steiner (PD)

What is the most disgusting behavior that you have ever witnessed? My guess would be that it was something you saw a domestic pet or wild animal do. As humans, we do not often understand the seemingly bizarre and foreign behaviors that are carried out by the animals around us. Right here in the heart of the Rocky Mountains we are in the presence of an animal whose behavior would make any of us nauseated.

"A lot of people would say a landscape is indifferent, or nature’s indifferent. A lot of people get the feeling that Southeast Alaska, the Inside Passage, if you get in it, if you get off that cruise ship—which is how most visitors see it—it’s menacing. It’s not just that it doesn’t care about you, it wants to eat you." -- Bjorn Dihle on the Inside Passage.

(PD)

Sugars are creeping into our diets and, "Even if you're reading labels, you have to read the labels with some insight," says Jon Jackson.

"There's a lot of hidden sugars in our foods, that even people who are well-intentioned and disciplined find it difficult to restrain their weight growth because they keep running into hidden sugars."

Listen in now to learn more about where hidden sugars are showing up, and how to spot them on food labels.

Exploring The Landscape Of The Pixie Cup Lichen

Jul 2, 2018
Pixie-cup lichen.
Bernard Spragg (PD)

Lying on my stomach on the fringes of the forest, my view is perfect of a colony of tiny lichens. They are perched on top of a rock outcrop, beyond which lies a majestic view eastward across the cold, choppy waters of Flathead Lake and on to the Mission Mountains looming on the opposite shore. 

The lichens resemble pale green miniature goblets, and look as though carefully set on a table of bright green moss.

In The Trail to Tincup: Love Stories at Life’s End, a psychologist reckons with the loss of four family members within a span of two years. Hocker works backward into the lives of these people and forward into the values, perspective, and qualities they bestowed before and after leaving. Following the trail to their common gravesite in Tincup, Colorado, she remembers and recounts decisive stories and delves into artifacts, journals, and her own dreams. In the process the grip of grief begins to lessen, death braids its way into life, and life informs the losses with abiding connections. Gradually, she begins to find herself capable of imagining life without her sister and best friend. Toward the end of the book Hocker’s own near-death experience illuminates how familiarity with her individual mortality helps her live with joy, confidence, and openness.

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