MTPR

Clare Menahan

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Clare Menahan is a recent Journalism graduate at the University of Montana. She supplements her income working as a freelance musician, seasonal backcountry ranger and ski instructor. Her work has also appeared in Camas Magazine and Reflections West.

Honey Honey live in MTPR's Studio B, July 17, 2018.
Nick Mott

It was so fun having Honey Honey live in Studio B this week. Here they are performing "Yours To Bear" on MTPR July 17, 2018.

People gather in Missoula to protest the Trump administration's policy of separating families attempting to enter the country illegally at the southern border, June 20, 2018.
Clare Menahan

  

Several hundred people rallied in Missoula and Kalispell Wednesday to protest the Trump administration’s policy of separating families attempting to enter the country illegally at the southern border.

Though President Trump overturned that policy through an executive order Wednesday afternoon, many in Missoula remained skeptical.

Morel mushrooms.
Flickr user Ann Althouse (CC-BY-NC-2)

With temperatures on the rise, many Montanans have one thing on their minds: finding that perfect morel. MTPR's Clare Menahan has details about harvesting legally on area national forests.

Last year’s devastating fire season means Western Montana has become a mushroom-picking haven for thousands of local and visiting mushroom pickers.

The John Ruffatto Business Startup Challenge happens Friday at the University of Montana
University of Montana Blackstone Launchpad

Local college student entrepreneurs are competing this Friday for $50,000 in prize money, but they need a really savvy business idea first.

Jacqui Crisp of Columbia Falls lifts her squirmy daughter out of the stroller to carry her during a trip to the grocery store. Crisp moved to Montana to be near family who would support her through drug treatment and the final months of pregnancy.
Rikki Devlin for the Missoulian

Pregnant women using opioids in Montana aren’t receiving adequate care, according to a joint investigation by the Missoulian and the University of Montana Journalism School. As a result, more infants in Montana are being born dependent on narcotics. That means they can experience withdrawal symptoms - anywhere from fussiness and trouble feeding to seizures or death in extreme cases.

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