MTPR

Montana News

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. Senate voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh as a Supreme Court justice, while protesters gathered outside the U.S. Capitol to voice their anger at the decision.

Kavanaugh's confirmation felt nearly inevitable by Friday afternoon, when two previously undecided senators, Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., announced they would support him. But that near-certainty did not stop protesters from gathering outside the U.S. Capitol and Supreme Court early Saturday.

Threshold S02 Episode Two: Invisible Hands

Oct 7, 2018
Shishmaref, Alaska.
Auricle Productions

When a major storm hit Shishmaref, Alaska in 2005, the town became a poster child for climate change in the Arctic. Dramatic pictures of houses falling into the sea showed up in news outlets around the world. But the story here starts way before that storm.

Montana U.S. House candidates Greg Gianforte and Kathleen Williams.
(Williams: Olga Kreimer/MTPR)

Wilderness Study Areas:

During the debate, Congressman Greg Gianforte pushed back at challenger Kathleen Williams’ accusation that he had introduced legislation, without public input, to release more than 700,000 acres lands classified as Wilderness Study Areas.

The Kavanaugh effect is tightening the Senate race; new ads are getting nastier; debates are sharpening candidates’ profiles and messages; and Libertarian candidates could impact the outcome of close races. Sally Mauk, Chuck Johnson and Rob Saldin analyze this week's campaign news now, on "Campaign Beat."

Screenshot of Daines' video statement

Montana’s Republican Senator, Steve Daines, will likely not have to return to Washington D.C. by private jet tomorrow to help confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. 

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